80. Do’s and Don’ts for Boss’s Day + Avis Oopsie

Episode 80: Do’s and Don’ts for Boss’s Day + Avis Oopsie (Summary)

Boss’s Day is just around the corner. What should you get YOUR boss? Do you NEED to give a gift? And what does it mean if you’re a boss and you DON’T get something for Boss’s day? We’re diving into our favorite holiday of the year now on Boss Better Now!

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Transcript – Episode 80: Do’s and Don’ts for Boss’s Day + Avis Oopsie

Joe:
Boss’s Day is just around the corner. What should you get your boss? Do you need to give a gift? And what does it mean if you’re a boss and you don’t get something for Boss’s Day? We’re diving into our favorite holiday of the year now on Boss Better Now.

Suzanne:
You’re listening to Boss Better Now. This show is sponsored by Joe Mull and Associates. Now, here’s your host, speaker, and author, Joe Mull.

Joe:
Welcome back, BossHeroes, to your regular dose of advice, humor, and encouragement for bosses everywhere. If you are the kind of leader who strives daily to create the conditions for people to thrive at work, that makes you a BossHero, even if you always don’t know what you’re doing. I mean, frankly, neither do we. We’re all just kind of making it up, aren’t we? But we gather from time to time on this here Friendly Neighborhood Podcast to work it out together. So, let’s do that. I am thrilled to welcome back to the show, my new co-host, executive coach, HR advisor, and scratch golfer, Suzanne Malausky. Hey, Suzanne!

Suzanne:
Well, hey, Joe! Good to be with you again today. You know, I try to keep my golf score a secret, and it’s not because I’m a scratch player.

Joe:
Okay. So, you don’t have the prowess on the links that I attributed to…attributed to you in that introduction?

Suzanne:
Well, no. I mean, I look good when I’m out there. I just claim I’m always having a bad day. But, if we think about my score, it’s more like a three-golfer. Hmm. And by three, I mean, I’m three over par generally on every hole.

Joe:
Ah, okay. Well, listen, there’s still a name for that, it’s Triple Bogey, and my whole thing is… (Suzanne: That’s right.) If there’s still a name for what you shot, you’re not terrible.

Suzanne:
Okay. I, I like that. And I did look up like what’s the highest score you can get for your handicap score. Yeah. And I’m not quite there. Okay.

Joe:
See…I don’t know any of that.

Suzanne:
I’m not the worst of the worst, yes. Okay.

Joe:
Yes. I know there are numbers of people that have a handicap or people who know what does it need to be a scratch golfer? I don’t know any of that. I just try to whack the ball toward the hole. And I do pretty well about half the time.

Suzanne:
<Laugh>. Well, it would be a pleasure to play with you sometime. We have to do that. (Joe: Absolutely.) Okay.

Joe:
Well, we are one week away from Boss’s Day. It’s on October 16th. It’s a Sunday this year, so it makes it a little awkward to celebrate it, but we are celebrating it here because our podcast releases on Sundays. And so, one week out from Boss’s Day, I thought it made a ton of sense for us to talk about some dos and don’ts for Bosses Day, and especially around some of the questions that I get often related to Boss’s Day. So how does that sound to you, Suzanne? Is it okay if we talk a little bit about Boss’s Day?

Suzanne:
Yeah, it sounds great. It’s absolutely an important day. I think one of the questions we should add is, do I give the gift on a Sunday on Monday? On Friday? Right. You know, that might be a little awkward, but we could figure that out.

Joe:
Well, I, I think that the way my brain works is yes, do I want people to make up a story in their brain about the motivation for the gift? Like if Boss’ Day is on a Sunday this year, and I’m on top of that and I’m planning, I might give that gift on a Friday because I want that person to know like, hey, I was, I’m aware of this, this is happening. And, you know, thanks for being a great boss. Because I would be, I would be afraid that if I gave the gift on a Monday, and it was the day after the official Boss’s Day, they would think maybe I just ran out to the Hallmark store and got a little something, you know, out of guilt. And…

Suzanne:
And the Boss’s Day mugs were on sale by then. Yeah.

Joe:
Here’s your 50% off great boss mug. Yeah, <laugh>,

Suzanne:
Here you go.

Joe:
But I think actually in a lot of places, it’ll probably happen on Monday because don’t Sunday, like Sunday holidays often get observed on Mondays, right?

Suzanne:
Yes. Let’s go with that. I, I agree.

Joe:
Okay. I think I, well, one of the questions that I get often is, what’s an appropriate gift for Boss’ Day? What should I get my boss? And so, I told you ahead of time that I was going to be asking this question, so you’ve had some time to think about this. Where do you stand? What, what should people get for their boss on Boss’ Day?

Suzanne:
Well, I think the most important thing would be considering what the boss might like.

Joe:
Hmm.

Suzanne:
So, a random something or rather that they’re not going to enjoy or might not appreciate or might exasperate the fact that you don’t know them very well. Ah. I would spend some time thinking about what they like, you know, it’s, they like a good fall candle. Do they like to read? Do you see them? Do they play golf? Just try to get something that’s personalized and shows that you see them as a human being – not just the boss.

Joe:
Yes. There are going to be thousands of employees across the world doing like secret Facebook research and Instagram research on their boss’s profiles. Be like, what do they like? I don’t really know. Oh, look, they’re holding a Snickers. Maybe they like Snickers. Maybe I should give them a Snickers. But I mean, there’s, there’s, that’s valid, right? If we can encourage folks to, you know, get a sense of what people like, what, what is personal to them, that, that gets experienced as thoughtful. Right? A favorite candy bar is great. Favorite coffee pods or, you know, a favorite hand lotion. That’s a thoughtful gesture. It shows that you’re paying attention to who they are as a person.

Suzanne:
Yes. It’s just not the… the apple that everyone gives the teacher. You’ve put some thought into it, you know who they are. And that way it can be appreciated and feel like it’s, you know, sincere.

Joe:
Yes. I have a couple of other ideas to throw out there. Okay. I wrote a blog post about this a couple of years ago for Boss’s Day, and I went, “Let me go back to that blog post.” What was the advice I originally gave for gift ideas around Boss’s Day? And I went back, and I read it and I was like, “Wow, these are really good ideas.” And so, I thought maybe I would share some of them back here on the podcast. And the very first one on the list was the one you put your finger on, which was to pick something personal. And that’s absolutely great advice. I wrote, what if you can cook or bake Sometimes that’s a really nice gesture, right?

Suzanne:
I’ve done that one.

Joe:
Like, if you’ve got skills in the kitchen, taking the time to make something for that person is a, it’s a thoughtful gesture, but (Suzanne: Mm-hmm. <Affirmative>), we have to be cautious about allergies. Right. Putting your boss in anaphylactic shock would probably work against you come performance review time.

Suzanne:
Exactly. <laugh>,

Joe:
My other idea was like if you love your boss and you really want to do something that just gives them all the feels, you could create a thank you video. Like you could take your cell phone and go around and ask everybody to record a 22nd message of appreciation, and then you string those clips together and like post it on their LinkedIn profile for Bosses Day. That’s amazing.

Suzanne:
That would be amazing.

Joe:
Right. And I’ve got one more.

Suzanne:
I like that. Okay. What else do you got?

Joe:
You could write a letter to their family, right? You come together as a team and you write a letter describing all the ways that, you know, your mom or, or your husband or partner makes a difference in the lives of the employees here. And you thank the family for sharing that person with you. Isn’t that a cool idea?

Suzanne:
I like that! That’s pretty cool. That’s pretty cool. I like that. Yeah. And that’s, that’s a gift of effort and thought not of cash. Right?

Joe:
Absolutely. And I would make…

Suzanne:
Know those gifts, I’m sorry.

Joe:
No, no, go ahead.

Suzanne:
Those gifts I get from people who you felt like they put some thought in, like, you get me, right? Yes. That’s when you feel like, oh my gosh, you know, I feel appreciated or I, you know, can really be grateful for the effort they put into it.

Joe:
Absolutely. And if you do something like the letter or the video, how does that person not feel appreciated around something like that? Absolutely. Yeah. And, and I actually think that goes to the larger point, which is that in most cases, the sentiment matters more than the gift. And so, for Boss’s Day, really, you don’t have to buy a gift. I think a personal note expressing what you value and appreciate about your boss wins the day. As long as you’re specific as possible. If you jot down a few sentences about how that person has helped you or supported you, to me, that’s the perfect Boss’s Day gift.

Suzanne:
Yeah. And that’s a keeper. That’s something that they can keep in their heart or in their celebrate file in the drawer. It’s not something they feel they have to keep on their desk, so you know that they, they still have it, or you know, eventually they have a lineup of great boss mugs, things like that. It’s really…

Joe:
There will be like 11 of them on that day.

Suzanne:
Something to hold onto, and I agree with you, I don’t think people need to succumb to the pressure of buying something. (Joe: Mm-hmm. <affirmative>), it could be getting the team to go to lunch together. It could be popping into your boss’s office and saying, hey, I just want to let you look him in the eye and say and say those things. Yeah. You know, I really appreciate the opportunity to work with you. I’ve learned this thus, and so you know, here to support you in any way I can, whatever that message might be. But that means a lot.

Joe:
Absolutely. And so, then that to me begs the follow-up question is, is, okay, what if my boss and I don’t have a great relationship, do I need to give a Boss’s Day gift?

Suzanne:
You might not have a great relationship, but you might know something about them. You might know enough to know if they would appreciate that, or if they think those things are stupid or that type of dialogue is fun for them or is it embarrassing. Right? Yeah. So again, it’s being aware and knowing them as much as you can, even if you don’t get along and if you don’t get along, even a gesture of graciousness or asking their advice or extending yourself in some way that works to, to try to connect a little bit deeper and more what do I say constructively. Yeah. With your boss, I think is a gift in it of itself.

Joe:
Yeah. And, and it’s one of those things where you have to kind of align the, what you do for Boss’s Day with the reality of your situation. Like if you have a relationship filled with tension or conflict or you know, there’ve just been, there’s a history there, then a gift that doesn’t, that that kind of is over the top is going to feel like insincere or sucking up. Right. And so, we’re not there to try to use Boss’s Day to fix our relationship with our boss. Right. You know, we want to work on what’s most important in any employee-boss relationship, which is real and candid communication based on mutual trust and respect. And if you have a relationship that’s just awkward or strange or weird, then a Boss’s Day gift might feel awkward or strange or weird. (Suzanne: Mm-Hmm. <affirmative>.) But I think to your point though, some kind of gesture could be a way to thaw that tension, especially if you’re able to sincerely celebrate something that, that they do or that you respect about how they show up. (Suzanne: Mm-hmm. <affirmative>), you know, even if it’s just leaving a note that says, “Hey, I know we don’t always agree, but I want you to know that I appreciate that you always take the time to listen to what I have to say, Happy Boss’s Day.” That, you know, that might even just put you on an even path together for a little while. And I don’t think (Suzanne: Mm-hmm. <Affirmative>), we can underrate that.

Suzanne:
No, I don’t think so. Cause I was even thinking a drive-by, if, if there, if you used humor before a drive-by visit saying, hey, I know we’re going through a rough patch, but I still appreciate you, you know, and run the other way. Because it’s not the day to have the conversation, but it’s a day to kind of bring neutrality to that, or yeah. Look for an opening to show that you’re human and yeah. You recognize they are too…

Joe:
<Laugh>, but you can’t do that if you haven’t acknowledged the rough patch before. Right? Cause if you walk in, you’re like, hey, I know we’re going through a difficult time. And they’re like, Wait, we are what? And you’ve run out of the room. That’s just <laugh>

Suzanne:
Ok. Yeah. Again, note your situation.

Joe:
Yeah. We are going through a rough patch up here. Like in my head, things aren’t good between you and me and we haven’t said that out loud. Great. I care, I still care. So, this is a question that I’ve been asked more than once around this holiday. What does it mean if I’m a boss and I don’t get anything from my employees for Boss’ Day?

Suzanne:
Well, we could go down the negative path like Uh oh, maybe I’ve not created that environment. (Joe: Yeah.) Where I’ve given them the support they need or built the relationships with. I need, if you’re new, it may be to them or to the team, it may just be a norm that no one has figured out yet. Yeah. it may be a signal that you need to, to work a little harder, dig a little deeper in building relationships. I wouldn’t get paranoid about it. Because it depends on the industry, you’re in. What people have done, are they being aware of it? You know, everyone’s so, so busy. And have you seen, it’s like National Sons’ Day again?

Joe:
Yeah, I saw that. That’s, we had National Daughters’ Day and then we had National Sons’ Day, and like, I didn’t know this was a thing. And should my kids be offended if I didn’t post about them on Facebook?

Suzanne:
Exactly. I just texted my kids, Okay, you know, I love you. I’m not putting anything up. Is that okay? Unless you need something <laugh>, I can do that. And then my son said, No. I thought Sons’ Day was in March. I’m like, well, it might be then too. I have, you know, so it just might make something that kind of like Sweetest Day that was big in Ohio, not in Pennsylvania.

Joe:
Oh Yeah. Do you remember that…

Suzanne:
That, so…

Joe:
That it’s like Valentine’s Day, but six months later, those are Hallmark holidays. Those are holidays designed to sell cards and gift wrap.

Suzanne:
That’s right. <Laugh>. And you can’t blame them. Good, good sales, good marketing. So, while we believe Boss’s Day is super important, it doesn’t mean everyone’s aware of it or the norm. And you really, as a boss, you shouldn’t be measuring your worth on “X” on gifts, right? Yeah. It’s really about performance and feedback and dialogue and all the things that you’re measuring from that perspective. So, I wouldn’t worry about it too much. Yes. Now, if everybody down the line has a gift, you know, if you’re like in an office and everybody else has one, then it could be an opportunity for reflection time, right?

Joe:
So, we think about this the same way because my, my first blush reaction is, is there a pattern? Right? So, if you receive nothing for Boss’s Day, my initial reaction is that is no big deal. People are busy, people are distracted. It …people are forgetful. It’s not on our radar for a lot of folks. So don’t make up a story in your brain about what it means for how you show up as a leader or what your people think of you if you don’t get a gift for Boss’s Day. Right? I’ve had a lot of people tell me that I was a great boss to work for and, I had many, many years where I didn’t get anything for Boss’s Day, and I didn’t take that to be any kind of commentary on who I am. However, there’s a but coming. It does feel like, is there a pattern. Are we seeing other signals that communicate that maybe I should be a little worried? And so, you listed one of them. If Boss’s Day is celebrated by everybody in the company and all the other managers are getting all kinds of stuff, there’s a pattern that we should probably pay attention to and start to question, what does it mean that, that I didn’t have that same experience? I think another one is, are you getting signals or, or experiencing concerns that maybe your leadership style isn’t working or that people aren’t responding to you, or that they don’t trust you? So, do you have a lot of turnover in your department? Do people join and then leave? Do you have to… do you feel a lot of resistance when you interact with people when you share information when you give directions when you ask for things? Do you feel excluded from conversations from the normal social interactions that take place on a team? I think not enough, but most bosses have a kind of sixth sense about whether or not they’re in a good place with their direct reports. And if you’re feeling that there’s a gulf there of some kind and you don’t get a Boss’s Day gift, and those other things that I just mentioned are all happening, well, that’s a pattern. And we can take a step back and say, Okay, maybe this is a chance for me to do some reflection or do some assessment or just start to think about how do I change things up in my leadership style to show up in a way that that better reflects the kind of relationship I want to have with my people.

Suzanne:
I agree. I agree. And the one advice that comes to mind I received from another HR leader was, if they’re coming to your office, you’re needed. Right? Yeah. So, the other signal could be no one’s calling me with problems. They’re not stopping in. Maybe it’s a little bit of that not feeling included, but if they’re not if they don’t search for signs of needing you then maybe there’s something else you could be doing, something else to think about and reflect on.

Joe:
Absolutely. Well, I, and I have good news for the folks who are listening to this. Even if you don’t get a Boss’s Day gift from your direct reports, I am giving you one next week on Boss’s Day. We’ve got a little surprise planned here for the show. I’m not going to say what it is, but we’re going to give away a special something in place of this podcast next week. So, our episodes release on Sundays, which next week is Boss’s Day. So, on Sunday, October 16th, for all of the BossHeroes who are listening tune into our podcast, podcast, easy for me to say, for your special surprise, a little gift from us to you for Boss’s Day. All right, folks, one of the things we love to do around here is answer your questions. We just answered three questions that we get a lot around Boss’s Day

Joe:
And so, is there a situation at work that you’re struggling with? Is there a scenario that you’re facing with a direct report or with somebody else on your team that you are trying to figure out how to address? Are there challenges you’re facing in your work environment that you could use some advice on? We want you to email us your questions. You can do that by sending a message to bossbetternow@gmail.combossbetternow@gmail.com. Send us your questions and we may address them here live except we’re recorded on the podcast. That’s bossbetternow@gmail.com.

Joe:
All right, Suzanne, that brings us to the Camaraderie Question of the Week. Bosses build camaraderie on teams by making it easier for people to find things in common with each other. That’s why every week here on the show, we give you a question you can use at meetings or in huddles, or in one-on-ones to facilitate connection and build camaraderie. This is a fun one. I think the question is this. Tell us about the last three pictures you have on your phone. All right. I also gave you notice that this question was coming so that you didn’t have to, you know, talk about anything awkward. But I mean, I don’t have any awkward photos on my phone.

Suzanne:
Oh, no, no. I didn’t have to erase anything. No, no, no, no. Not at all awkward at all. <Laugh>. All right. So, I, I just looked up, I looked in and looked at my gallery on my Samsung and I often take, you know, screenshots of quotes that I like to save to maybe use it another time. And so, the third one is a quote that is says, be humble, be hungry, and always be the hardest worker in the room. Which I thought was coming off of the Quiet Quitting conversations. Yeah. Yeah. I still want to be the hardest worker in the room, but the smartest, hardest worker. Yes. Right. Okay. the second one, we had the pleasure of visiting Charleston, South Carolina this weekend. So as a click of the bridge of the pretty water scene there. So that was cool.

Joe:
Shout out to South Carolina!

Suzanne:
Yeah, it was beautiful there. Love your city. Then the last one has a little mystery to it. So, it is a picture of a signed piece of art. Ooh. That was in my husband’s father’s belongings, and it was rolled up and I pulled it out. There’s two, two signed copies of something. Oh. And so now I, I took a picture of it cuz I got to figure out where on the world wide web can I put this? And someone could tell me who,

Joe:
What Yeah, what is it through it.

Suzanne:
But you know, it’s really just dawned on me. There was this piece of paper in the thing and it’s an obituary for Salvador Dali So could those prints be Salvador Dali’s? Wow. We could, we could be rich.

Joe:
And not know it yet.

Suzanne:
Or have, you know, really highly valuable artwork in our home. So, stay tuned. I’ll let you know what the, how I solve that mystery

Joe:
Or this is the greatest long prank ever.

Suzanne:
Right. <laugh>. Right …”watch the kids get all excited about this.”

Joe:
He drew pictures at the dining room table in like 1947 and then he stuck this, you know. Okay. We got to come back and tell us though.

Suzanne:
I will, I will. I promise that.

Joe:
Oh man, I’m, that’s a cliffhanger. I don’t know that we’ve ever had a cliffhanger before on the Camaraderie Question of the Week. You’re bringing it on like your third episode. Bring episode. Way to go!

Suzanne:
That’s right.

Joe:
Very cool. Those are cool pictures that tell us a little something about you.

Suzanne:
It does. What have you got?

Joe:
All right. Okay. So, I looked at my phone right before we sat down to record and my last three pictures are as follows. First, there is a selfie of my son Henry, who is six, and anybody listening to this who has kids knows that any chance they can get the little ones like to steal the phone and then they just hold the button down and they take the 3,700 selfies of them making all the same face or many different faces. And so, I deleted 3,699 of them the other day and I kept the one cuz it’s actually pretty cute. It, we were at my other son’s soccer game and he’s just sitting in the camping chair taking a selfie, which was fun. Awesome. the picture right before that one was of our closed above-ground swimming pool in the backyard. So, we had just closed it you know, a couple of weeks or so ago. And that’s like one of the saddest days of the year for me. Cuz for me it’s all about like, it’s the passage of time. It’s the signal that another summer with my little ones is gone. And I always post a little sad face with it online. And then the third picture was from, was sent to me. So, I saved it to my camera role. It was sent to me. Okay. I was just on stage in Boston for a healthcare organization up there. Really incredible group of people. And they rented a local theater, this beautiful old theater that’s been completely refurbished and they had their annual LDI there, their annual leadership development intensive. And so, I got to open it with a keynote on creating a destination workplace in the new age of work. And the coolest thing about this, Suzanne, was that it was run by the stagehands by the, the union stagehands there. So, the tech was amazing. Wow. And they had all the, like I had a whole team of people who were like hooking up my stuff for me and putting the mic on and just, you know. Sometimes when you’re, you know, present in a hallway and then like the next day you get to fly to this historic theater. That’s pretty cool. So, the third picture was a picture that my client snapped of me on stage at this historic theater. So that’s my…

Suzanne:
Well, and theater is your jam. So you were on the right stage, weren’t you Joe?

Joe:
Yes. Like, it was this perfect moment where I was like, I don’t know whether to get up here and, and do a keynote or just start singing from Les Mis cuz I kind of wanted to do that too. Right.

Suzanne:
I know, I bet you did. I’m, I bet I’m sure you held true to your contract and did what you were there to do, right?

Joe:
Yes. Although I was tempted to belt something out, I thought maybe if I, if they invite me back, maybe I’ll throw that element in. (Suzanne: Okay. I like it.) There you go. I like this question for a couple of reasons. Because it, it just gives us a glimpse into people’s lives. But as we always say here on the show, don’t forget the opt-out option. If people don’t want to talk about the pictures on their phone, they don’t have to. If they only want to pick one or they just want to pick a couple at random, it doesn’t have to be the last three. You know we want — don’t want to make people uncomfortable, we don’t want people to be excluded. This is about inclusion and getting people connected and building sophisticated relationships. And so, you may have to amend this question accordingly and that’s Camaraderie Question of the Week.

Joe:
All right folks, well we are so excited that you are joining us this week. And believe it or not, there are only a few weeks left in the calendar year. And if you’re planning a meeting or an event in 2023 and you want to give your attendees a dynamic program on leadership, on employee experience, on hiring and retention, well how about me? My new keynote on creating a destination workplace in the new age of work is filled with stories and humor and tons of insights on what it takes right now to find and keep devoted employees. And so that’s what I’m going to talk about if we get the chance to work together in a way that is fun and engaging. Cuz the way I see it is if I get asked to speak in an event, I have two jobs. The first is to provide substantial answers and takeaways to real-world problems so that those people in attendance can show up differently and get better results. My second job is to do that in a way that is utterly captivating. A keynote program should be fun and energizing and wildly informative. So that’s, that’s how I see it. That’s how what I set out to do every time. So, 2023 is just around the bend and my calendar is already about halfway full, so don’t wait. If you want to protect a date or get pricing or learn more, then let’s talk. All I need you to do is email hello@joemull.comhello@joemull.com.

Joe:
All right, Suzanne, we’re going to close today with a little segment we do around here every once in a while, that we call Story Time.

Joe:
And this is a story that I’ve started telling recently about something that I heard in the news, and I think it, it, it contains a really powerful message about how the little things matter. So, check this out. About a month ago, a woman named Giovanna from Canada rented a GMC Yukon SUV to help her daughter with her college move-in. She picked it up from the Avis Car Rental at the Toronto Pearson Airport in Ontario. And she drove about 186 miles back and forth that weekend between driving to her daughter’s town moving furniture and boxes back and forth and making an occasional stop for a hot and steamy Tim Horton’s — the coffee, not the dude. She returned that SUV and then she went on her way. That is until she checked her credit card statement and discovered that Avis had billed her more than $8,000 in excess mileage charges. According to Avis’s records, Giovanna had actually driven the car 22,369 miles that weekend. Well, actually it’s Canada. So, what they said is that she drove 36,482 kilometers, but they said it very politely. Now, a, a simple bit of math makes it very clear that this is some kind of billing error, not a whirlwind weekend driving across Canada pounding Labatt Blue and evading the Mounties. That sounds worse than it should. But friends, 22,369 miles is nearly the circumference of the earth. In order for Giovanna to have traveled that far in the three days she had this vehicle; she would’ve had to have driven for 72 hours straight at an average land speed of 310 miles per hour. Clearly, this isn’t possible. So armed with math, she said about the task of trying to get a refund, and yet she struggled. First, she contacted the local rental office for help, and she got none. Then she contacted Avis’s corporate headquarters, which refused to issue a refund, and she even asked Visa for some help with this ridiculous charge on her credit card, all with no luck. It was only after her story was picked up by the local news that somebody at Avis finally picked up a calculator and said, oh, <laugh>, I guess this is impossible. Maybe we should look into this. You know, Avis is slogan is, “We Try Harder”, though in this case it feels like it’s, “We Try Harder… Sometimes, but Not Really”. Avis eventually discovered that the problem stemmed from an incorrect odometer reading taken when the SUV was dropped off. Apparently, when Giovanna returned the vehicle, the person checking it back in recorded the wrong total mileage into Avis’s system, and then everything went haywire from there.

Joe:
There are a lot of lessons for us out of this crazy story, but for me, the most important one might be how the little mundane things we do in our jobs every day that we often do mindlessly because they’re so routine, can cause huge problems for people if we get them wrong. Who knows why that odometer reading got entered incorrectly? Maybe that employee was distracted by a personal problem that day and just looked at the dashboard too quickly. Maybe he noted the mileage correctly, but then when he went to punch it in on his tablet, he entered it wrong because his fingers were cold. After all. As you might know, Canada has four unique seasons almost winter, Winter, still winter, and July. Nevertheless. Let’s take a moment and use Giovanna’s misfortune to remind us all how important the little things are in our work. And because around here, we focus mostly on helping leaders become better bosses. Let’s put this into that context. Never forget how much influence so many aspects of our work have on people’s lives. If we skim an email too quickly, fly to payroll, fly through the payroll too carelessly, or we fail to listen attentively, there’s almost always a domino effect that can create an issue that negatively impacts others, and that can become a big headache to fix.

Joe:
In fact, an argument can be made that it’s not solving sophisticated problems or diving into big projects. That’s a leader’s most important responsibility. It’s the little things, the day-to-day things. What we have to get right every day are the little details and duties that few people notice and that we do often that make everything else and everyone else around us work well. So, slow it down, pay attention, and be careful with the details. They tend to matter most. Oh, and if the next time you need to rent a car, you want to consider someone other than Avis. Here’s my advice. Choose a national brand, preferably an established Enterprise, one that stretches your Dollar and is friendly to your Budget. After all, if you end up with a bad car rental agency, it Hertz. That was a lot of work for some Dad Joke-level puns at the end there.

Joe:
All right, friends, that’s our show for this week. We’re so grateful that you stopped by and gave us a listen. Thank you for taking the time to be with us. And if you liked what you heard, if you enjoyed this episode, we would love it if you would leave us a review on whatever platform you’re listening. Just scroll down and if there’s a writer review option, just click that, write a few words about what you think about the show, and click submit. People look at reviews and they use them to decide whether or not they’re going to listen to an episode. So, we thank you for any effort you can put into leaving us a review. In the meantime, thanks for all that you do for taking care of so many, and we’ll see you next time.

Suzanne:
This show is sponsored by Joe Mull and Associates. Remember, commitment comes from better bosses. Visit joemull.com today.

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