58. Stop Hiring + 5 Beliefs of Better Bosses

Episode 58: Stop Hiring + 5 Beliefs of Better Bosses (Summary)

The age of hiring is over. If you’re still trying to find the best person for the job, you’re using an outdated, broken strategy for filling roles in your organization. I’ll tell you what you should be doing instead. Plus, the 5 beliefs of better bosses. We have an exciting opportunity for you now, on Boss Better Now.

Links:
To learn more about Joe Mull, visit his website ​Joemull.com​.
To hear more from Joe Mull visit his YouTube channel​.
To learn how to invite Joe to speak at an event, visit ​Joemull.com/speaking​.
To check date availability or to get a quote for an event, email ​hello@joemull.com​.
To explore options for coaching from Alyssa Mullet, visit ​Joemull.com/coaching​.
For more information on the BossBetter Leadership Academy, visit Joemull.com/academy.
Email the show at bossbetternow@gmail.com.
To leave comments, ask questions, or to message us visit our Boss Better Now Podcast Facebook Page.
Connect with Joe on Instagram.
Connect with Joe on Twitter.
Connect with Joe on LinkedIn.

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Transcript – Episode 58: Stop Hiring + 5 Beliefs of Better Bosses

 

Joe:
Hey, BossHeroes! Good news! You can now sign up for my BossBetter email newsletter with a single text. Twice a month I’ll send advice, resources, and words of encouragement straight to your inbox. This is the only way to make sure you get everything we share and never miss a thing. Just text the word BossHero to 66866 to get signed up. That’s BossHero, all one word, to 66866. Or you can visit BossBetterNow.com to subscribe. And now, on with the show!

Joe:
The age of hiring is over. If you are still trying to find the best person for the job, you are using an outdated, broken strategy for filling roles in your organization. I’ll tell you what you should be doing instead. Plus, the five beliefs of better bosses. We have an exciting opportunity for you now on Boss Better Now.

Alyssa:
You’re listening to Boss Better Now. Please welcome speaker, author, and planner collector, Joe Mull.

Joe:
Well, welcome back BossHeroes to your show! The show that answers your questions, supports you on your journey to lead better and strives to restore your boss soul. We also like to make you smile and laugh along the way. To help me do that, as always, my fantastic co-host, Alyssa Mullet. Hello, my friend.

Alyssa:
Hello. So, like planners, as in like…cuz, I consider myself a journal junkie.

Joe:
Yes. Yes.

Alyssa:
So, like, must plan all of the things nicely color-coded perhaps. Do you have a specific niche that it is like, this is the planners?

Joe:
I have like planner ADD. Okay. I will get a planner. I’ll be like, this is great. And I’ll use it for a little while and be like, eh, it’s not, it’s not good. It doesn’t, it doesn’t meet my needs completely. And I’ll look around for something different. And then I got proactive this year when we were getting to the first of the year and the, the book I was using was about done. I thought, okay, I’m gonna look around. I’m gonna find the right one. And I ended up…I’m really embarrassed to admit this. I ordered four. I ordered four different planners and I didn’t like any of ’em.

Alyssa:
Oh no!

Joe:
So my whole thing is so I like the bullet journal model. And so for years I would use a dot grid, blank numbered notebook. And I still actually prefer that. Um but I use my bullet journal for a lot of weekly task planning and tracking and I also use it for a lot of note-taking. And so I was trying to find one that had more kind of weekly calendars, but not ones that took up the whole double spread. Had room to make task lists and notes. And I don’t like insert planners, like where you buy the subsets and you put them in. I don’t like that. I like a hardbound kind of thing. And I just feel like I’ve turned into a total snob about some of these. It’s like just get some paper and a pen, bro. Like it’s not that complicated. I don’t normally call myself bro. But the result is, as I was prepping the podcast episode, I looked over at like these four planners sitting on my desk, one of which I’ve begrudgingly chosen to use. Like, I’m like, ok, this one’s gonna have to be good enough. And I was like, okay, I guess I’m a planner collector now. So that’s why that’s there.

Alyssa:
I’m reaching here. Listeners, you can @ Joe with your favorite recommendations for him. Now, this one is, is the one that I have chosen, and I love it. Well, anything by Sarah Steckler is amaze-balls, but this is called the Daily Productivity and Brain Dump Book. And I love it for exactly what you’re talking about, Joe. Like I, she has it where you can do it daily. I do it for weekly and then like I spread it out and then the task list and then all the things.

Joe:
And you’re a journal collector, you said.

Alyssa:
I’m a journal junkie.

Joe:
Okay. Well, so how, how does that work? Do you just collect them cuz you like ’em or you’re writing in them every day? You’ve talked about your writing habit.

Alyssa:
Yeah, yeah, yeah. I am writing in them. Not every day. I have different ones that I pick up at different times. So simultaneously to the planner that I have there, the daily brain dump, I’m also using the Outlaw Journal that’s for entrepreneurs. I love that one by Melanie Knights.

Joe:
Outlaw Journal? I thought it was for cowboys.

Alyssa:
The Outlaw Journal. It’s amazing. Great stuff.

Joe:
Cool.

Alyssa:
And then I just love really beautiful like beautiful imagery and paper journals, just blank. Right. anything to like spur any kind of artistic creative juice for just writing. You know, blanket writing. But then I also just love, you know, prompt journals and I have all the ones that like say like, you know, Give it the F up, you know, like what to let go of, you know, with all of the little other prompts that are supposed to be meaningful and all of the rest of this things. So I like it all. I love it all.

Joe:
Well, I can’t pass up this opportunity, and you didn’t ask me to do this, and I wasn’t planning to do this, but I cannot pass up the opportunity to also mention that you’ve created two journals and that people can get those journals. So, I’m gonna invite you to take 30 seconds and tell us about these two great journals.

Alyssa:
So sweet. Thank you so much. So I have the, I Am Learning Pocket Journal. Both of these are available on Amazon. The pocket journal is a tiny little four by six, just it’s perfectly in your briefcase or what have you. And you can take down your podcast notes from your listening. You can take down therapy notes, and that doesn’t mean you have to be in therapy means however you receive therapy outside whatever.

Joe:
It could meditation, it could be reflection, it can just be ideas.

Alyssa:
Exactly! And also I have some templated pages in there for you to write down key learnings from your readings, from articles, or from books you’re having in your stack as well. And then my latest journal is actually called Capturing Parenthood Memories Journal. And this one is for those of us that are parents. I’m calling at the anti-baby book. Cause this is not one you whip out and you show everybody. This is one to record what you experience as a parent. So, I have some pages in there that are prompted that say, you know like I giggled when, or, you know, the time parenting nearly killed me. And then you know, you give that information and you can record your kids’ names and you know, their ages and all of that kind of fun stuff so that, you know, what you experienced and when, and then there’s plenty of blank pages in there for you too, to make your own document.

Joe:
It’s a really nice book, what Jess and I have one, it’s a hardcover. It’s a really nice book. So if you wanna find that, I think you could just go to Amazon and type in your name, right?

Alyssa:
Yeah, exactly. Yep. And both of those will come up under my authorship. Yep.

Joe:
Well, maybe I’ll get a couple more of those and add them to my planner collection and decide if I can use them to keep myself organized. You gotta come out. You know, you gotta come out with one that does exactly what I wanted to do Alyssa with. And we’ll, we’ll, we’ll get into the details offline.

Alyssa:
For you, Joe. For you.

Joe:
Thank you, my friend. Well, folks, I wanna talk today about something you heard me say really at the top of the podcast. I’m in the throws right now of writing my third book and full disclosure, It’s really hard to figure out how you say what you wanna say. And the book’s probably gonna come in somewhere between 40,000 and 60,000 words, which means I will need to write about a hundred thousand words as far as the editing process and the organization process. And so this is a long, arduous journey. But one of the ideas that I keep coming back to in the basis for the book is that the age of hiring is over and that we now live in a place where we cannot focus on trying to find the best person for the job. We actually need to create the best job for the person. And so I, as I was doing some writing of the book, I ended up writing a little summary of an idea that I shared on my LinkedIn page and shared with our BossBetter email subscribers that got some reaction. And so I’m gonna share it with you. The premise was this, that if you are struggling to find and keep devoted employees, maybe it’s time to start operating like a college football recruiter. So when student-athletes are weighing where to enroll, they will choose the program that they think is most likely to help them realize their personal and professional dreams. And if you are a college football coach, you’re also a recruiter. And so you have to go into kids’ homes with their families and make a case for why your school is the best school for them. And so college football recruiters know this. They know that the kid is gonna choose the program that is most likely to help them realize their personal and professional dreams. And so they build their entire pitch around why their program is the best way for the recruit to get where they want to go. They sit with that person and they say, Hey, do you dream of playing in the NFL? You know, we sent 24 players there in the last six years. So we know how to get you there. Oh, wait, you want to start right away and get a lot of playing time. Well, here’s where you’ll be on our depth chart, or you want to be great at your position. Well, let me introduce you to your position coach, who is one of the best in the country. And as recruiters pitch this, it’s all about tailoring their program to fit what that person wants most out of that opportunity. And once the recruit decides that a program is right for them, they commit. They literally commit. They sign a letter of commitment. They say this is where I’m going. They choose the program that they believe will ultimately help them live the life that they want to live. And I would argue that this is where we are at right now. When it comes to finding and keeping employees. This is the world we are operating in right now when it comes to staffing. If you wanna attract and keep the best people, they need to believe that yours is the job that best meets all their wants and needs. And so we should be doing the same thing that college recruiters are doing. College football recruiters are doing. We should be saying to candidates, oh, Hey, you’re a single parent with young kids at home. Well, we offer flexible schedules and remote work, and a bank of PTO you can draw from on day one. Oh, wait. You wanna gain experience in this particular field and enhance your skills in this particular area? Well, we have a thriving mentorship program and you’re gonna spend at least five hours a month working with your mentor. Oh, what’s that? You need to do this work at a higher pay rate? You need to earn more? Well, our pay scales are in the fifth percentile of the market and we pride ourselves on paying at the top percentage of industry scales. So we have to be going out into the world and attracting people in this way. But then here’s the second part of this, Alyssa, and then I’m gonna ask you to respond to everything that I am thrown out there. You can’t just recruit the pitch. It can’t just be words, right? You actually have to deliver on your promises. So in college football, if a player starts to believe that the program is no longer a good fit, their commitment waivers. They actually, they literally can de-commit. In college football, you can decide this program isn’t a fit for me anymore and you can enter the transfer portal and you can look for a new program that gives them what they want. They call it de-commit.

Alyssa:
Hmm.

Joe:
And so the same thing happens with our employees, right? If we don’t deliver on our promises, we lose commitment quickly. But if we do deliver on our promise, if our employee experience helps people live the life they want to live, you not only supercharge commitment, but you create this kind of recruitment loop. Because when college football players turn into successful alumni, they become lifelong ambassadors and recruiters for that organization. And they encourage other talented people to join it. So this is my argument that the age of hiring is over. We now live in an age of recruiting. And that instead of trying to find the best person for the job, we actually have to create the best job for the person. You know, there’s an argument that it’s really hard to find and keep devoted employees. And you know, maybe it’s not. Maybe it’s easy if you be…if you create a place that checks all the boxes for somebody in terms of what they earn, and how they work, and what they do, and how their boss treats them, and how that job fits into their life. It’s not that hard. You’re actually gonna have a fair amount of people who flock to your organization. All right. I’ll hang up and listen to the rest show.

Alyssa:
Now I… wow. I, first of all, I can’t wait for the book. I know I’m sure it’s treacherous getting there, but we’ll all be waiting for it.

Joe:
Thanks.

Alyssa:
This whole analogy… I’ve learned. Again, I learned so much on the podcast. Every single episode I learn something new. I had no idea about this sports thing at all. Committing and de-commit. I had no understanding of all of that, but I freaking love this analogy because it like blows my mind thinking about what it actually would do in a workplace. What I think we can all agree would be so meaningful if organizations commit to that kind of strategy. Right. But I think that it also requires then for organizations to understand and release or decommit to trying to be everything to everybody. It’s not this, you know, we have it all, cuz like you said, okay, we have this mentorship program, okay, we have this. If you promise all of that. And then the like 5% of that actually is occurring, right? That’s not the program and you will continue to experience the hiring cycles and the terminating cycles. And this is the process we will continue to go through.

Joe:
Yep.

Alyssa:
But rather if you can align those programs with the organization’s core values, with the mission, all of those things and truly commit, these are the things we’re gonna focus on. And yeah, these other things are nice and good, but that’s not where our expertise lies or that’s not the kind of benefits or programs that we think. And that we have shown the kinds of folks that we want to attract here that are going to be the best fit and have the best experience in our workplace.

Joe:
And believe it or not, that’s actually supported by the college football recruiting model. Because not every school can be the University of Alabama, which has been the most dominant college football program in the country for the last 15 years. There are, there are people that Alabama ignores. They don’t recruit them because they don’t see them as being good enough. And so other schools go for those kids, right? So those schools sit across from a kid and their family, and they say, we are not the right fit for kids who get recruited by Alabama for five-star recruits. We’re the right fit for three-star recruits who have flashed the potential of five-star recruits but have been ignored by bigger schools. And so we are the right fit for a talented kid who is looking for an opportunity to prove himself. We’re the right fit for someone who wants to be a part of something new and that’s growing, right? Like if your program has won 10 championships, that’s what you sell. Join our program and you’ll become a national champion. But if you haven’t won a single championship, you can’t sell that. But what you can sell is the hope of, and the opportunity to be a part of something special. That’s coming down the pipe, like come join our program we’re a program on the rise. You know this is a chance to prove yourself. You sell it differently. It’s just like when, as part of the recruitment process to attract talent for an organization, you say to a candidate, yeah, you’re right. You can get a; you could probably get higher pay elsewhere. If you go work for this big XYZ company, you might be able to get higher pay there. But with us, you’re going to get this pay, but you’re gonna get these three or four other things that typically don’t happen in those other programs. And so we’re right for people who are looking for that.

Alyssa:
Yes. Like it can’t be this like sales of all the things, right?

Joe:
Yes.

Alyssa:
And then a bait-and-switch.

Joe:
Right!

Alyssa:
Because I, I think a lot of us have experienced that in the workplace where they’re like, oh, the, the, you know, all the culture of the panel that I interviewed with five bajillion times told me, oh, that this was the culture of the workplace. And this is what was, you know, important for them. And then you get in there and you find out that in reality, that’s like number five.

Joe:
Yes.

Alyssa:
You know, on the list of 20.

Joe:
And, and here’s the thing that’s shifted. So some recruiters and head hunters have been operating this way for years for positions where there is a shortage of talent and the roles are hard to fill, right. Really competitive jobs where you’re throwing, signing bonuses, and lots, of different competitive offers. Where you have to pay at the top of the market for someone to even look at you. We’ve seen some of this in like software engineers and, and certain roles in healthcare. And so these corporate recruiters, they, they have had to operate this way for some time where they go into a, a candidate opportunity and they paint a picture of what life is gonna be like for that person here and why they should join. And as soon as it becomes clear that that organization isn’t matching what that recruiter sold to them, they’re gonna lose that talent. And so, it’s those recruiters, those head hunters, those folks who are really working to fill the hard-to-fill roles who are coming back to the organization and saying, we have a culture problem because you say you’re one thing, but people experience something else. And so there’s a disconnect and you’re making it even harder to fill these positions because we’re not able to create the kind of opportunity and the culture and the experience that keeps people here. And it has to get fixed, or I’m not gonna be able to get you the talent that you need to compete. So what has shifted is that right now, we’re in a moment where that’s that way for nearly everybody. It’s not just those hard to fill in roles anymore. I mean, if you run a restaurant and you need servers, and wait staff, and cooks, you gotta be asking yourself what would make this restaurant the very best place in the region to be a cook? Or the very best place in the region to be on the wait staff. What would I need to provide to make my company, my experience for that position, look and sound like that to someone? Uh and if I’m not doing that, then know that I’m gonna have a harder time attracting talent or that somebody else may poach my team members when they create it and I don’t.

Alyssa:
Isn’t that… The thought pattern that you, you know, lose this talent, right. And not only did you put all the time, you know, the all of that ROI into, you know, training, whatever it might be.

Joe:
Yes.

Alyssa:
But then you, additionally, rupture, dismantle, completely implode your reputation, tenfold over. Cause like, what’s that rule, you know, even at a restaurant, if you go there and you experience like, you know, something bad, you tell eleven-teen-hundred people, right.

Joe:
Was that eleven-teen-hundred?

Alyssa:
It was eleven-teen-hundred.

Joe:
That sounds like a lot!

Alyssa:
So again, if you’re asking yourself, okay, what is truly going to bring me and keep me in the, in line with what I need to do, what the focus of our business is, the structure, the, what, the services that we offer. You start asking your current employees as well. What would make you want your best friend to work here? How, what would make you suggest your to, you know, someone that you respect to come and work here? What would we have to do differently? Or what could, what approach do we need to take in order to make sure that we keep you?

Joe:
And I think there are probably a lot of leaders listening to this who do hiring, who find that their hands are tied by the larger organization’s policies or approach or pay structures. And so if that’s you, BossHeroes, if you’re listening and you’re going out into the world and you’re trying to hire, and you think, yeah, Joe and Alyssa, that sounds great and I can try to sell many of the good things that would appeal to people in terms of what they’re looking for now in a job. But I’m also really held back by some things that are out of my control. What’s really important is that you are speaking up to the powers that be in your organization to say, listen, I consistently go out and try to hire. But what we are offering is out of touch with reality at the moment. And so we cannot compete. We, we, we are offering $10 when everybody else is offering 12 or we’re offering $20 and everybody else is offering 25. We’re offering this kind of benefits package. We’re, we’re paying for 20% of people’s healthcare. And everybody else is paying for 40%, you know, depending on the position. And depending on the role, you have to speak up and ask, how do we make sure that that message gets heard loud and clear? Because oftentimes the people who are making those decisions about what they wanna pay are doing them through the lens of expenses. They’re doing them through the lens of profit. And you may have to speak up and say, no, no, no, no. Like we’re losing money every day because we can’t fully staff. You’re concerned about what this person’s going to cost you. And I’m trying to tell you, look at what it’s costing us to not have these five persons. You know, there’s a different metric that needs to be used here. We can’t compete until something changes. So, you know, if you’re listening to this, that might be the only tactical takeaway for you. Is, is speaking up and helping expand the understanding that people in your organization above you have between what their expectations are for hiring and the reality of what you can and can’t do.

Alyssa:
The other thing that I would offer to those individuals who are truly, you know, handcuffed by those kinds of circumstances is do yourself a favor, come up with some language, make it authentic to you in which you are offering candidates, a realistic job preview. There are some people that are still gonna choose to come work for you in that organization. Right. But the more realistic and honest that you can be and to say, okay, you know, I know you said that, that, you know, X, Y, and Z is really important to you. Moving up in promotions is like, you know, your number one reason that you, you wanna come work for our organization. And what I wanna tell you is that you know, I, as a leader, recognize talent, and that gets rewarded in terms of do, do, do, do, do do. But as a, as an organization right now, I will be honest in relaying that upward motion and promotions to this level of management are not something that we are able to move swiftly on right now. And so I want to be realistic with you and manage those expectations upfront so that I’m not promising you something that is not going to be the reality.

Joe:
Because, and I’m gonna continue that conversation with the candidate because one of our core values here is transparency. And so I know that you’re probably talking to a lot of other organizations right now who are promising you the moon. And they’re not gonna be able to deliver on that. I mean, maybe some can, I don’t know. But I want you to come in through the door with your eyes, eyes wide open, I would much rather you have an authentic experience to what we talked about than come in, do the work, and be disappointed. And because one of our core values is transparency, we’re always gonna prioritize being honest with you. And so, yeah, the kind of upward mobility that you’re looking for, isn’t necessarily a possibility right out of the gate. Could that change? Maybe. But here are the other things that you’ll experience.

Alyssa:
Yes. Yeah.

Joe:
All right, folks. Well, do you agree? Do you disagree? Do you have additional thoughts? We would love to hear from you. You can always send your comments, reactions feedback, and of course your questions, we especially love getting your questions. You can send those to us via email at boss better now, gmail.com. As I said, at the top of the program, our show is built on your questions. So don’t be shy. Email us at BossBetterNow@gmail.com.

Joe:
We are now at the Camaraderie Question of the Week, my friend. As you know, because I say it every single episode, bosses build camaraderie on teams by making it easier for people to find things in common with each other. And so every week we give you a question you can use to facilitate connection and build camaraderie. Our question this week, Alyssa, is this: If you could remove an entire month from the year, which month would you choose and why?

Alyssa:
I love this question. Cause it’s like fun at least you know, something lighthearted, hopefully. I mean, maybe you could get some tragic stuff from here, but hopefully, it’s not that for everyone. For me, I’m gonna go with like either February or March. It’s really a toss-up because in our neck of the woods here in PA, like February’s generally gonna be frigid and gross. Icy weather poop. Okay? March you have more of the same, but there’s hints of that thing that they call the sun in other places. It comes here every once in a while during that month. And so I, I, I like it a little bit more, but it’s longer. So I, I was trying to like really figure out do I just want to do away with the whole February thing or take the longer, possibly maybe that sun thing month of March. I’m not quite sure. One of those two.

Joe:
Yeah. I am with you. My answer is very similar. I disagree about February though. My answer was March. Okay. So, okay. I would not cut February because what my birthday’s in February. So my birthday was last week. It was February 25th. I gotta have my birthday and plus you get Valentine’s Day. So I’m keeping February, but March is a slog. March is a bit of a dumpster fire in Western Pennsylvania because it’s a black and white movie. It’s gray. Everything is gray. It’s like if depression had its own month, March, Yay. March is sadness because let’s think about it. You come out of the new year, you come out of the holidays, right? There’s a little kind of seasonal dip, but January is kind of like reinvention. It’s a new year. There’s a little bit of energy around that. And then you get into February and you’re like, oh man, it’s winter. By the way, for those of you listening to this in like San Diego, you’ve got no idea what I’m talking about. Cuz it’s like 80 and sunny there every day. But for those of us in the Mid-Atlantic or in like, if you live in Wisconsin or Seattle right now, you are feeling me on this. You get into February and you’re like, oh man, there’s a lot of winter left. But then you get Valentine’s day and there’s some love. And like, for me personally, I get my birthday. March 1st. You land on March 1st and you’ve been like, oh, it’s been cold for four months. When’s the sun coming. Oh, wait. What’s that? It’s still more than two months away? Ugh! Right? Cause we lie to ourselves every year. We lie to ourselves in Western Pennsylvania. We get to April 1st and we’re like, spring is here! No, it’s not. April sucks too.

Alyssa:
Yeah. Yeah, it does.

Joe:
Like, pay attention. They say, April comes in like a lion and goes out like a lamb. No April comes in like a lion and goes out like a lion, April stinks. You get to May 1st. And you’re like, isn’t it supposed to be warm yet? Why is it still 40,

Alyssa:

40? Ooh. It’s a heatwave.

Joe:
It’s a heatwave. Yeah. But imagine if you could chop out March and jump from like February 28th to April 1st. Oh, then there’s hope then you’re like, oh, it’s only a couple more weeks in, you know?

Alyssa:
Oh, that’d be great. Right. You convinced me you’ve sold me on March. Yeah.

Joe:
Yeah. I thought way too much about this. I was thinking about this yesterday cause I knew we were gonna answer this question. Like what would I choose? Oh, March is awful. We gotta get rid of March.

Alyssa:
All right. We agree on this. I am sold.

Joe:
And folks, you gotta, like, you can @ us. You can tweet. I’m @JoeMull77 on Instagram and on Twitter. Like would, would you pick a different March or, excuse me, a different month? Or do you have love for March? Are you gonna come, come back and be like, you can’t delete March. And here’s why cuz it’s like St. Patrick’s day. Cuz that’s your thing. Okay, cool. You know, let us know. We would love to hear from you. And that is the Camaraderie Question of the Week.

Joe:
All right, BossHeroes, I don’t have to tell you that when it comes to teaching leaders how to be better bosses, one-and-done training doesn’t work. And the only way that managers at any level learn to succeed at being a boss is through ongoing training and support. That’s why last year we launched something really new and different. It’s a subscription program for companies called the BossBetter Leadership Academy. Every month your managers get a bite-size virtual program from me. And they are seriously bite-size. Most are between like 15 and 25 minutes long. And they come with a discussion guide for every program. And we do monthly office hours with me to ask questions and then everything gets stored in a digital vault that you can access 24/7. And so this program, since we launched it, has gotten just glowing feedback from our subscribers. They love that their busy leaders only have to find a few minutes each month to get better. They love the guidance and the scripts we teach for better employee conversations. And they love that their leaders are working with me a little bit every month for less than it costs to bring me onsite for just a one-hour program. So if you have been looking for an affordable way to help ensure your leaders continue showing up as better bosses, then let’s talk. If you want all the managers in your organization to learn from me all year long, this program might be perfect. You can email us hello@joemull.com and ask for more information about the BossBetter Leadership Academy subscription that’s hello@joemull.com.

Joe:
Okay. We’re gonna end today with a short video that actually if you’re listening on the podcast, will just be audio. That ended up being the most popular video I shared in 2020. So, we talk a lot here on our podcast about, as a leader, being values-driven and having clarity on what your beliefs are, what your values are around how you wanna show up as a boss. And as 2020 dragged on…drug on? Dragged on? It’s dragged on. As 2020 dragged on, um I was looking for ways to continue to encourage bosses and I ended up recording this short video about the five beliefs of better bosses. One of the things about being values-driven that is really important is that you do the work yourself to create some clarity around what your values are and, you know, what you believe about how you should show up as a boss. And so, this clip is not to tell you what you should believe. It’s more of an accounting of the pattern that I tend to see the most around the leaders who are the most effective. And so, this clip is an acknowledgment of the beliefs and, ultimately the values, that seem to be the most common among the bosses who have the most success leading people. Enjoy.

Joe from recording:
As someone who has spent years teaching leaders how to be better bosses, I have met some remarkably talented leaders and I have seen and heard horror stories of bad boss behaviors that would make your toenails curl. Among those leaders who are the most successful at energizing teams, changing culture, activating employees, and producing results are a core set of beliefs that are constantly present. First, when it comes to their employees, the best bosses believe ‘they know more than I do’. The most effective leaders recognize that each of their people has insight, knowledge, and experience that they’ll never have because each of those employees sits in a different chair than they do. The best bosses become obsessed with mining their personnel for their unique perspective so that the boss can be better informed and make better decisions. These bosses assign tremendous value to the ideas, and opinions, and experiences of each employee in their charge. Second, the best bosses believe in giving away credit but owning failure. When something good happens, the best leaders say out loud, that’s not about me as the boss, it’s about my team, their effort, and what they accomplished together. When something doesn’t go as planned, the best leaders accept responsibility for the failure. They say that’s on me. I’m accountable. They say that even if they weren’t directly involved. This mix of avoiding credit and absorbing blame is seen and heard often by team members because it’s a commitment that that boss lives out every day. The best bosses also believe ‘my style doesn’t always work’. Leadership begins with self-awareness. The best bosses know that their personality, their communication style, and more aren’t always going to reach every member of the team. So they work to be adaptable. They work to show up in different ways to meet people where they are. These bosses use tools like the MBTI or StrengthsFinder to understand the naturally occurring differences between themselves and others so that they can then flex their style to be more successful. The fourth belief held by the best bosses is that ‘I have to earn trust and respect’. Great bosses know that their title in the company org chart alone is not going to galvanize those they lead to care and try. When bosses micromanage, break promises, steal credit, stop listening, dismiss challenges, stifle creativity, ignore bad behavior, or play favorites, trust and respect disappears. And then employees do the minimum and act only in their own self-interest. But when bosses prove over and over again that they are competent at their work and committed to their people, trust and respect starts to form. It produces higher levels of commitment, effort, communication, and resilience. Trust and respect really are the magic fairy dust of employee performance. Lastly, the best bosses will tell you ‘my job is to create the conditions for people to thrive’. Ask a leader what they do for a living and you’ll get a variety of answers. You’ll get a list of tasks and responsibilities, of problems they solve, of obligations they must tackle each week, and more. Many will tell you I put fires out every day. But among the elite, among the very best bosses in the world, is a greater responsibility. One that sits above the tasks and duties that live with that manager day-to-day like doing reports, or going to meetings, or solving problems. Great bosses come into work every day believing that their job is to figure out what these people need to be at their best every day. And then I’m gonna fight like crazy to provide that for them. These bosses believe it is their fundamental duty to create the conditions that lead people to thrive. These are the five beliefs of better bosses. My people know more than I do. I give credit and own blame. My style doesn’t always work. I have to earn their trust and respect. And my job is to create the conditions for people to thrive. If you wanna spark your team, cultivate commitment, and be the kind of boss that people actually want to work for. These beliefs are your roadmap. Embrace them as your own and then translate them into consistent action that is authentic to you and visible to your teams. And you’ll be well on your way to being a better boss.

Joe:
All right, friends, if you liked what you heard today, we would be eternally grateful for a review of the podcast. If the platform you are listening on allows you to rate and review our show, please, please do so. Those ratings are important for many reasons and the absence of ratings can actually hurt a program. So right now, take a moment to give us some stars and leave your feedback about Boss Better Now. Until next time, thank you for all that you do to take care of so many.

Alyssa:
This show is sponsored by Joe Mull and Associates. Remember, commitment comes from better bosses. Visit joemull.com today.

 

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