17. I Love It Here with Clint Pulver

Episode 17: I Love It Here with Clint Pulver (Summary)

What does it take to get your employees to proudly proclaim “I love it here!” Our guest today conducted more than 10,000 undercover interviews with employees across the country. What he learned can transform your organization into a place where employees thrive. That’s what’s happening now on Boss Better Now.

Links:
To learn more about Joe Mull, visit his website ​Joemull.com​.
To hear more from Joe Mull visit his YouTube channel​.
To learn how to invite Joe to speak at an event, visit ​Joemull.com/speaking​.
To check date availability or to get a quote for an event, email ​hello@joemull.com​.
To explore options for coaching from Alyssa Mullet, visit ​Joemull.com/coaching​.
For more information on the BossBetter Leadership Academy, visit Joemull.com/academy.
Email the show at bossbetternow@gmail.com.
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Transcript – Episode 17: I Love It Here with Clint Pulver

Joe:
What does it take to get your employees to proudly proclaim, “I love it here”? Our guest today conducted more than 10,000 undercover interviews with employees across the country. What he learned can transform your organization into a place where employees thrive. That’s what’s happening now on Boss Better Now.

Alyssa:
You’re listening to Boss Better Now. Please welcome speaker, author, and book hoarder, Joe Mull.

Joe:
That’s true. I am absolutely a book hoarder. I’m the kind of person that cannot walk out of Barnes and Noble without at least two or three books in the bag. And then they go home and they end up on a stack, right? And that stack never seems to get smaller. It just grows. I had a speaker friend of mine once who called that his tower of guilt. That is a perfect description. Well Hello, BossHeroes. And welcome again to your weekly boss pick-me-up. As we say around here, commitment comes from better bosses. This is because bosses are the single most influential factor in whether an employee loves what they do and where they work. On this show, we strive to give you the insight, skills, and encouragement, you need to boss better. Whether you are listening on your favorite podcast app or streaming our video episodes from the Boss Better YouTube channel, we are glad you are here. And this week is a very special episode of our show. Now I don’t mean special like – this week on a very special episode of Blossom. I mean, special as in a rare treat. We don’t have guests on our show very often, but I could not be more excited to introduce you to today’s visitor. Clint Pulver is an Emmy Award winning keynote speaker and author of the new book, I Love It Here – How Great Leaders Create Organizations Their People Never Want to Leave. And that book is out this week. Clint is a former private pilot turned generational workforce expert, and he has dedicated his professional career as the “Undercover Millennial” to uncovering the secrets to what leaders are doing right. Please welcome to the show, Clint Pulver. Clint, thank you so much for being here today, man.

Clint:
You’re welcome, Joe. Thanks for having me on the show. This is a big deal for me.

Joe:
It’s a big deal for us, too. You’re our first guest. You’ve got a killer book coming out this week. Uh, congratulations on that. Tell us how I Love It Here came to be.

Clint:
Yeah. So five years ago, I was in a mastermind group. We were in New York City and we were meeting with other CEOs, business executives, learning about how they strategize and build successful businesses. And this one gentleman that we met with owned a large sporting good retail chain and a beautiful store in Manhattan. And we’re talking to him about his business and his philosophies and how he’s grown this organization. And one thing he talked about, he has this, he had this thick New York accent. I mean, he said, “You got to adapt or you’re going to die. You got to adapt or you’re going to die.” I was like, “wow”. It was a very profound statement. And I agreed with him. Like we’ve got to adapt in our businesses. We’ve got to be able to move with the market that’s always changing. But then I asked him a question. I said, so what about your management style?

Clint:
Have you had to change how you manage employees 20 years ago versus how you manage them today? And he fired back and he said, “No, the way I manage today is the same way I manage 20 years ago. And we get results.” Which was another fairly profound statement I thought. Hmm, okay, weird. He felt the need to change how his strategy and his business worked to meet the demands of the market, but there was no need to change his adaptation when it came to humans. And I looked around the store and all of his employees were my age or younger, all millennials, gen Z, young, young, young employees. And I just thought, I wonder if they would say the same thing, right. I wonder, I wonder if they would have the same ideology, the same perception that he did, that everything in his store is wonderful and amazing.

Clint:
And so I thanked the guy for his time. We had 35 minutes to kill, Joe, until we needed to be to the next place. I had nothing else better to do. So I walked up to one of the employees and I looked just like this with a hoodie on and a backwards hat. And the first guy I walked up to and I just said, Hey, I’m just curious. “What’s it like to work here?” And he got quiet. He kind of looked around. I felt like we were doing an illegal drug. But he said, “do you really want to know?” And I said, “yeah, I’m honestly curious.” He said, “I can’t stand it here. I literally feel like I’m a number, a dude. It’s just a job for me.” And then he’s like, “I don’t even think my manager knows I’m here right now.” And I said, “well, why are you still working here?”

Clint:
He said, “I’ve already applied to three other places. As soon as I get another job I’m gone.” And I remember, I did think like maybe the kid just woke up on the, uh, he woke up on the wrong side of the bed. Like he’s just having a bad day, maybe. So I went and asked another employee and another and another and another and out of the 35 minutes that I had, I interviewed six of his employees. And at the end of those conversations, five out of the six of his people said they would not be working for this guy in his store in less than three and a half months. (Joe: Wow.) And that was the moment Joe. That was the moment I started and that was almost five years ago when I began the “Undercover Millennial” program. And we have now worked with 181 organizations. I have interviewed over 10,000 employees as the “Undercover Millennial”. And how it would work is I would walk in, as a millennial, looking for a job. We would partner up with these organizations. And what we gained is it’s real, it’s honesty. It’s — they didn’t know that they were giving me the truth. That’s why they were honest. Like it wasn’t a survey. This wasn’t survey data. I’m not a manager in the company. I’m just another millennial. And the magic of the research was when I would go up to an employee and say, Hey, I’m just thinking about applying. What’s it like to work here? And they would respond with, “I love it here.”

Clint:
“I love my boss. Oh my gosh, Susie, you gotta meet Susie. Come here. Susie, come here.” And then when that would trend in an organization and employee after employee would say, “I love it here.” And the magic behind how great leaders created organizations that their people never wanted to leave. And that’s why we titled the book, I Love It Here. It’s a solution-based book. That’s, it’s not a leadership book written by another leadership expert. That’s not what this is. This is a leadership book written by 10,000 employees who knew when their leaders were getting it right. That’s the difference. This is, and it was an honor to be a part of it for a big part of my life.

Joe:
Well, there was so much in this book that make it a useful resource for people who are going to work every day and have other people in their charge. And your research, uh, reinforces this idea that, and this is how you said it in the book, bosses are the number one reason people stay or the number one reason people leave. How? Tell us more about how you came to that conclusion.

Clint:
Yeah, it’s management man. Here’s the thing is when, when an employee hated their job, they always talked about the manager, right? And when they loved their job… They always talked about the mentor. Okay. That was a unique find in the research. So there’s a difference between mentorship versus management. It’s not even leadership. Sometimes we talk about, well, you gotta be a good leader and avoid being the manager. We talk about leadership management. But what I found in the 10,000 interviews is that when they really loved their job, they were talking about a mentor, not even the leader. We look at traditional leadership is someone who sits in front and they’re on the ship. And they’re directing where the ship is going. You’re a leader. If people follow you, where — how do I get you from point a to point B to point C and how do we move this organization?

Clint:
You’re the CEO, you’re the leader you’re sitting in front and you’re leading. Now the manager is the person that’s on the ship, making sure there’s no leaks, making sure that the ship can be swift, making sure that we can be efficient, that we’re staying productive, but the mentor is the person that’s taking care of the people on the ship. The mentor, this is what was really interesting, Joe is this mentorship was not really a title. It was not something that could be given only be earned. That’s why it was so powerful. You do not become a mentor until the mentee invites you into their hearts, right? And when you could gain that role as a manager or as a, as a mentor, meaning that you were the catalyst, you were the person that connected those individuals to their dreams. You were an advocate, not just a boss and that powerful formula that people talked about. Mentorship versus management.

Joe:
I think so many of the folks who take time out of their lives to listen to a podcast like ours, you know, Boss Better Now, they know that’s the kind of relationship that they want to have with the people they are charged with working with. And they go into those relationships with a desire to be a mentor. But you and I both know, it can take time to earn that trust. Right? We have some folks in the workplace who, you know, I may right away as a leader, want to do that, one-on-one coaching and do that mentorship, and I care about you as a person; but some employees want to keep, keep their manager, their boss, at arm’s length. And it takes some time to earn that, as you said. What are some of the things that the best bosses you’ve heard about would do to close that gap and to be able to step willingly into that mentorship role?

Clint:
Yeah. The beautiful thing again about mentorship is it’s not really coming in and saying, I want to be your mentor, right? I want to be… That’s not how it works. Usually mentors are sought out because of who they are. Not because of the position they’re wanting to impose on other people. So for example, every mentor, if they became a mentor to somebody – they earned that right. When someone came to them and said, because of who you are, I like myself best – because of who you are you’re going to help me grow in this company, because of who you are, how I experienced me and how I experienced myself when I’m with you matters. That that that’s the mentality that we kind of need to think as I explain this, because there are five C’s that qualified somebody to be a mentor. I call them the five C’s of mentorship.

Clint:
And when employees would talk about these individuals, I always asked why, you know, what is it about them? Why did they yield such loyalty? Why were people willing to literally leave a company and follow them to another company, making less money in a, in a, in a work environment that’s, that’s new, a schedule that’s not conducive to their own needs. Why would they do that? Why would they stay later for somebody? Why would they work harder for somebody? And it was the mentor, but what were those characteristics? So number one, uh, the first C is confidence. Those mentors, they had a sense of mindset. Confidence is a mindset that built trust. It was the sense that you confidently know who you are as a leader. You know, also that you can get me to where I need to go. And you’re confident in that. I want to mentor with someone who is confident in the thing that they’re mentoring in.

Clint:
The second C was credibility. What’s your background wanting to be a mentor to me. I want to know where you’ve been. What have you done? Right? You might be the sales manager at the car dealership. How many cars have you sold before? Did you come up through the ranks where you’re part of the company? I want to know those things. The third C is competence. You might know everything about the game of basketball, but can you get out and actually shoot a hoop? Employees, when they had a manager who was also a practitioner, that mattered. They were competent in the thing that they were actually teaching. They weren’t just sitting back barking orders. They could jump in the trench and they could do. They understood the software. They understood the process of the sale. They were competent in their ability to mentor somebody in that, which they were talking about.

Clint:
The, the, the fourth, uh, C is candor. Hm, Joe, these people had the ability to create honesty and relationships that were so strong that honesty could exist. Right? We talk about the, the, the, the, the, the bank account — make the deposits of trust so they could make the withdrawals. They did. They, they, they understood that no significant loyalty will ever happened without significant connection. And if I can connect, then that allows me to have honest conversations. That allows me to uphold the standards that allows… That allows me to say, Hey, listen, okay. You’re, you’re doing really great with the customer service side, but you’re not entering the data properly. And that has to be a component to make this a successful thing. Okay? I love you. I care about you. I’m your advocate. I’m here for you. I want to be the mentor, but I need you to do this because that’s how we’re going to get better. Candor.

Clint:
They can have those candid conversations. I want to mentor with somebody who’s going to be honest with me. And then the fifth C…. Yeah, probably the most important. And that is caring. Your ability to truly just care for people. The moment we stop caring in management is the moment that we fell. Because again, everybody, this is what I learned, Joe. One thing that was really pivotal in, in the research is that every employee is asking the question –let me know when it gets to the part about me. And some managers here, that will, those entitled little shiny s….

Clint:
Let me know when it gets to the part about me. And I always say, no, no, no, no, no, no. It’s not so much about entitlement, as it is about good business. We have to bring humanity back into the workplace. Too many managers, literally, they’re standing in front of a fireplace and they’re saying, give me heat — Then I’ll give you wood. You look at their employees and go, no, no, you gotta earn my trust. No, no, no, no, no. I’m not going to connect with you. Be glad that, you know, you have a job. I show you that I love you, cause they give you a paycheck right? Long gone are those days. And we, were coming out of what I’m calling the great job turn of 2021, uh, where 2020, we saw a really high retention rates record, record retention rates because everybody’s so glad they had a job.

Clint:
They hunkered down, they held tight to what they had and now we’re coming out of that. And two things are happening. 1. Employees have had time to think, you know, does their job today look the same that it looked in 2019, a lot of jobs have changed. Pay structures changed. Working from home has changed. People realize, Oh my gosh, I can work in Colorado and live in another city, close to my family. I can, there’s just more options, right? Come out of this more competitive. And then 2nd, they will remember. They do remember how you treated them during the pandemic. Yes. And we did, we did quite a bit of research during the pandemic. We have a whole chapter dedicated to it in the book it’s called, “Brace for Impact.” And there were some pretty horrific things that we saw the bosses did — not just out of spite or cause they’re bad people, but just in chaos and chaotic times, people became the last priority. But on the flip side, I also saw how amazing bosses maintained the priority of people. They maintain the ability to make sure that people were safe physically, but they also felt safe that they were seen, they were heard, let’s practice some empathy — I get that you’re now the teacher at home and you’ve got seven kids and your spouse is working and they will remember how you treated them. And I think we’re going to see some massive shifts in the world of retention as we come out of 2021.

Joe:
And you just gave some perfect examples of one of the patterns that I saw in the book. So every time you were doing interviews and you encountered someone who said, I love it here…and then pointed to their boss as the reason why, I noticed when, when you asked, what about their boss made them a great boss, made them somebody that they wanted to work for. The two words that kept coming up over and over again in your book were kindness and connection. What are some other, uh, some of the other ways that leaders, regardless of what level they work at in an organization can go to work. And, and as a daily set of habits and routines, make sure that they are prioritizing kindness and connection.

Clint:
Yeah. I think again, every employee is asking the question, let me know when it gets to the part about me. So we need to make sure that we’re doing that in a way that’s conducive to the employee. We sometimes we take this one size fits all approach that I know what my employees want, or company X down the street does this for their employees. So we should probably do that too. And they will take the time to ask. We’ve heard that age, old adage, that, that, that saying, Joe, that if you, if you feed a man a fish, then you’ve only fed him for a day, right? If you can teach him how to fish, uh, and you’ve fed him for a lifetime. Every time I hear that I go, who said, the guy wanted a fish.

Clint:
Who said the guy wanted a fish. I’m not really a fish guy. Uh, sometimes I just want a steak. We just need to ask. We need to ask people. And one of the, one of the weird things is that many bosses don’t ask, they don’t ask. And they haven’t created relationships that if they did ask, they would never get honesty right. Now, most managers have no idea they’re doing poorly, which is unfortunate because you know, uh, you know, they sit down with an employee, they do the one-on-one management meetings, right? One-on-ones, one-on-ones what can I do better for you as your manager, most employees go, “no, you’re doing awesome.” That’s great because there’s no incentive for me to speak the truth. You haven’t created a relationship of trust. And what the employee is thinking in their mind is “you micromanage like a crazy person. You know, you talk bad about me.

Clint:
You’re, you’re the person that every time the team wins, you take the credit, right? When we lose you blame somebody else. And I’m thinking about, I’m thinking about going to another job.” And then they leave four months later and the boss sits back and they go, “duh…. So hard to find good work, ah, dang, millennials. They’re just not loyal or, you know, I never saw it coming.” And I would recommend right now. So that’s a long story to get to this point. But I think it’s important to, because again, that’s a real situation that I found time and time, and they just had no idea. So I would recommend what I call status interviews, status interviews. I came from the medical field. My background was in the, OR, and the doctor would repeatedly call out and say, what’s the status of the patient? Give me a status, update.

Clint:
What what’s, what’s what’s happening with the patient. And what they’re really asking is what are the vital signs reading? What’s the heart rate, the respiratory rate, the body temperature and the blood pressure. Those things are what keep you alive as a human. Now, the vitals though, to determine Joe, how you would treat a patient. You look at the vitals, you treat the patient, then what do you do? You recheck the vitals and then you treat the patient. You continue that cycle until healthy stability is maintained. Long-term. As we’re coming out of 2020 into 2021, this job trends happening. We’re getting better as an economy. I would advocate that you take your all-star employees, the employees that you need and want, and they’re just rock stars in your organization. And you conduct a status interview. And I believe every one of those employees deserves to be asked. These three questions. All status interviews should start with vocal praise. You’re not bringing them in to, this is not a time to talk about performance reviews. So it’s not a time to talk about quotas or expectations. This is just a time to check the vitals. First question is, what can I do as a manager to keep you here? What can I do to make sure that you stay John, listen, Susie, we appreciate everything that you have done. And we value who you are. And I just got to know, you know, things are changing a little bit. We’re coming out of this pandemic. What do I need to do to keep you there? Some managers are afraid to ask that because what if they ask for ski passes and a 20% raise, right? But here’s the thing. You might be able to do that. And they might….Any employee that’s worth giving and investing a little bit more into…. Congratulations then you just retain them for a longer period.

Joe:
Wouldn’t you rather know right?

Clint:
Accomplish it right. Or if they ask for, you know, I want a 50% raise and you’re like, I can’t do that. Be honest with them, let them know the situation. We can’t do that. But then ask for an alternative. Is there something else, something else that we can do, maybe it’s a let’s let’s let you have Fridays off. I know you love to go fishing. Let’s… Is that worth it? Can we, can I do something there? And if they go, nah, it’s not really important. No, there’s not any, there’s not a solution that’s met then at least you asked. Most people ask that question, “What can I do to keep you here?” during the exit interview. When the employee already, you know, almost has two feet out the door, ask that right now. Second question is, what can I do? Uh, or excuse me. The second question is, uh, what’s getting in the way of your success here? Is it the schedule? Is it the pay? Who is it? What, what what’s getting in the way of you thriving in this organization. And it leads to the third question, which allows you again, to become the mentor, to become the advocate. And that question is what can I do to help you get there? What can we do to keep what’s getting in the way of your success and what can I do to help you get there? Every great employee deserves to be asked those three questions right now.

Joe:
How often do you think a leader should be doing the status checks like this and cycling through those questions?

Clint:
Yeah. Every new employee should be asked that at least twice a year. But long-term employees, people that you’ve had around. I mean, at least once a year, you know, I’m, I’m kind of that on the side of like, I don’t w we try to take the load off of leaders to try to keep it as simple as possible. And sometimes it’s situational, right? Sometimes, you know, somebody that’s on the fence, we’ll get in there and do it right now. You know, it ends, but yeah, at least twice for brand new employees and once a year for long-term employees.

Joe:
Perfect. Folks who are listening to this, if nothing else, I hope you jotted down those three questions. You put them on a sticky note, hung it next to your computer, put it in your bullet journal. Uh, texted it to yourself in your phone somewhere so that you can have those at the ready. The next time you have an opportunity to sit down and check in with your folks. And if you can make a promise to do that, that’s a promise you keep to yourself, it’s a promise you keep to them. Uh, and I think that those are three incredibly powerful questions. Thank you for sharing those with us. Clint. We are going to pause for a moment and keep a promise to our listeners. And Clint has agreed to play along.

Joe:
Folks, bosses build camaraderie on teams by making it easier for people to find things in common with each other. When co-workers discover shared interest or circumstances, they access each other’s humanity, which makes team success more likely and team drama, less likely. That’s why every week we give you a question you can use at meetings or at huddles to facilitate connection and build camaraderie. We call it, Clint, the Camaraderie Question of the Week. And sometimes they’re sophisticated and fancy. And sometimes they’re just silly and fun. And so we’re going the silly and fun route this week. Here’s the question. What is a food that you used to hate, but now you love? What say you sir?

Clint:
Mashed potatoes. (Joe: No kidding?) Yeah, I know it sounds so weird. When I was a little kid, my mom would plop those nasty things on my plate and she’d be like, “Eat your potatoes.” I just, I could not gag them down like the texture, but I just, I hated it. And it was so funny. I, I, I come from a, uh, religious background where some of us go on on missions. And, uh, my mom, I tell you, I’ll tell you what she would always say, Clint, you better eat your potatoes, or God’s going to send you to Idaho on your mission. And I was like, “Whatever.” And she put those down on my plate and I wouldn’t eat ’em. And I got my mission call and I got called to Boise, Idaho. (Joe: No, you’re kidding?) Dude. My mother, the sick woman that she is, she, she rolled on the ground for like two hours and laughed and she said, boy, I told you God has a sense of humor, and you are going to learn to love mashed potatoes. And I got sent to Idaho for two years. And, uh, I learned to love potatoes, mashed potatoes.

Joe:
Is there gravy on there? Is there something else in there that makes them work for you now that wasn’t there before?

Clint:

Yeah, man, I, I, I’ve learned to eat…. There’s so many different ways to do it. You know, put the little thing in the microwave and you’re done. Like there’s there’s man, you put some cheese in there. Some gravy put a little bit of spices. I’ve become a convert. I’ve been converted to mashed potatoes.

Joe:

My kids are going the other way. I grew up loving, mashed potatoes. And uh, but my, my kids don’t want anything to do with them. Right. And so maybe, maybe they’ll follow your path, your path later. Yeah.

Clint:
Yeah. I don’t know. It’s crazy, mashed potatoes.

Joe:
My answer to the question. I I’m going avocados. Uh, I did not like avocados for the first 40 years of my life. I didn’t think they tasted like anything. Uh, but for the fat… In the past four years, I’ve really kind of fallen in love because I think the secret to avocados is what you do with them and, and how you pair them with other foods. Put them on a burger, man. That’ll change your life. Put them in a salad. Um, you know, smash them up, add some spices, call it guacamole. I have come around. Uh, I’ve always had a love/hate relationship with anything green, but I have come around on avocados. Are you an avocado?

Clint:
I am an avocado fan. Avocado toast is like a breakfast favorite. (Joe: Good stuff.) Yep. I love it.

Joe:
All right. Well that is our Camaraderie Question of the Week.

Joe:
We’re going to pick back up with Clint here in just a moment.

Joe:
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Joe:
Well, Clint, there are a couple of things that jumped off the page for me in your book. And I wanted to make sure that I asked you about them before we ran out of time. Uh, one of the things that you were very intentional about saying in the book is that whenever possible organizations should hire internally, why is that so important? And how does it make people say, “I love it here.”

Clint:
Yeah. Growth opportunities, growth opportunities, growth opportunities. If your employees can’t grow where they are at, they will go and grow somewhere else. And when you communicate that there’s hiring opportunities internally, and we look internally first as an organization… My goodness, we brought you into our organization for a reason, why would we not try to make sure that you thrive within this organization? You’re a candidate that we appreciate. You’re an employee that we value and we want to see your success in the company. We want you to stay long-term, uh, you know, and when there’s not those growth opportunities internally, it’s, it’s almost like you’re sitting in a line of Disneyland and, and you’re waiting for hours and hours and hours. And then, they just keep putting people in front of you, right? They bring in people, they grab people from outside the park and they throw them in your line.

Clint:
And you’re like, why, why? And next time, when you go on vacation, you’re not going to Disneyland. You’re going to go to Six Flags, right? It’s like that meant, you know, when we hire internally and we allow people to progress and we give them something to look forward to, I call it potential, right? There’s got to be potential in your company. I think every employee should have a growth development plan and that growth develop and should consist of an opportunity to be promoted if they want it. Some employees don’t want that. They love where they’re at and where they’re at is where they want to stay. But if they want to progress, do you have that vision in place where that employee can actually become something in your organization? Not just an employee.

Joe:
And there’s such a correlation between giving people those opportunities, but also making sure that those opportunities align with their strengths and their gifts and their talents, right? Our show, just two weeks ago, we spent a lot of time talking about activating talent and why it’s so important for people to get to do work that really aligns with what they’re good at. And in the book, you call this giving people a chance to do what they do best. What kinds of conversations, you go into great detail in the book about this. And I would love to hear you talk about it for our listeners about the kinds of conversations that bosses need to be having to make this happen so that so that people can do what they do best each day.

Clint:
Yeah. That’s a great question. I, and we saw this a lot in management where you would have a manager that had no business being a manager, they were put into a management position because the CEOs or the executives or upper management was, they were like, you were a really great employee. You sold a lot of stuff and we want you, we have no idea what to do. So we just promote you into management, but they have no, they have no strength of connecting with people. They don’t want to connect with people. There’s no desire there. They’re not looking at management as a stewardship position. They look at management as a burden. And so I think sometimes we have wrong people in these wrong positions. And then there’s the ego that goes with…Oh my gosh. If I get demoted as a manager or we have the pay thing that I, so I’m just going to keep running the show as a, as a manager that hates my job.

Clint:
And so it’s really important to ask the employees, like, what do you want to do? Like if you could use something else in this organization that stirs your heart, that pulls on your heart strings, that would allow you to do something that plays to your strengths, what would that be? What does that, what does that look like for you? You know, is this something in the company that you would want to grow into? Like for example, we did a lot in, in fast food and, and you know, in that world, there’s high turnover, right? If you can get someone to stay for three years versus three months, right. That’s, that’s a win. Do you know, what’s the college job for them, they’re going to school. And my goodness, if you can retain them for four years until after they graduate. And, Oh my goodness, if you actually have a conversation and you show them that there’s a future, maybe they’ll take that degree when they do graduate college and they can continue to move forward. Maybe they own a franchise. Maybe they become a district manager. I mean, you don’t know that unless you ask them and also show them what those opportunities look like. What w w w what would be the idea of success of perfect opportunity in this company for you?

Joe:
Right. Right. Well said my friend, uh, well, before we let you out of here, I wanna tell you that I think my favorite part of the book is the story of Lee, the Bell Captain. Uh, would you take a few minutes to tell us about Lee, uh, and about his style and the kind of impact he had over time?

Clint:
Yeah. Lee, the Bellman, uh, the Bell Captain is he’s incredible. He’s still a massive part of my life and has impacted more humans at work than I’ve ever seen. I mean, he just ate, slept, and drank and breathed good mentorship in the workplace. He understood the ability to become an advocate. He understood that he needed to get to the part about us as individuals. And we all knew that we had our back. We all knew that Lee cared about us personally, but we also knew that he had high standards. Those are two things in management that I think, you know, then we were able to see in the research that if an employee was satisfied or dissatisfied with their job, I could always trace it back to those two variables, the standards that the boss had, or the standards the boss didn’t have, or the connection piece that the boss had, or the connection piece that the boss didn’t have connection and standards.

Clint:
And, uh, he became that person who was equal in both. And in doing so, he became respected. Not just liked, right, that he wasn’t always liked. I’ll admit that there were some people that still had issues with Lee, but he was respected because he truly was that mentor. He had the confidence, he had the credibility, he was beautiful ah Having candid conversations that he cared about us. He was the guy that would go and, you know, break bread with us on the weekends and would come to family events. And he just took interest in our lives. He realized that we had a life outside of work, and he also realized that a lot of us might not stay in that position forever. And that if we move on, we would have been, and we were better humans because we met Lee, the Bell Captain. And on the flip side, Joe, we’ve never forgotten him. You ask every bellman that ever worked for Lee, the Bell Captain, we all remember him. We cherish him. And so many of us try to emulate that with our relationships, with our spouse or relationships with our kids. His legacy impacts our lives on the daily because of who he was and how we experienced ourselves. When we were with him, he became the iconic, legendary figure. He became the mentor.

Joe:
And it’s a perfect and beautiful story that, that demonstrates the example that it is possible to have high standards, to have high expectations, to expect people, to give as much as they can in a role, as long as you, as a leader are willing to give them just as much back in creating the kind of environment that will lead them to thrive. So, um, it’s a wonderful story. (Clint: What a concept, right,?) Right, right. Isn’t that something? If we, if we give it all we’ve got for our people, it’s much more likely they’re going to give it all they’ve got for us. (Clint: Absolutely.) Well, my friend, I can’t thank you enough for being with us today. I know the work that goes into preparing a book and congratulations on this. In a world that grossly under-prepared leaders at all levels for the role, this book is a terrific and much needed resource for bosses everywhere. So tell everyone where they can get the book and how they can keep in touch with you after today.

Clint:
Yeah. So you can get the book on Amazon it’s, uh, available, uh, this week type in I Love it Here on Amazon, grab the book and connect with me at clintpulver.com. I’m on all the social media channels as well and happy to connect with with anybody. I appreciate you, Joe. I appreciate what you do. I appreciate our friendship and it’s been an honor for me to be on your show. Thank you.

Joe:
Oh, the pleasure has been ours and you are the first official guest on our podcast and, and, you know, home run my friend. So thank you so much. Really appreciate it.

Clint:
Thank you, Joe.

Joe:
All right, friends. That’s our show. Please remember that you can subscribe on Apple podcasts, audible, Google, Spotify, Amazon, iHeartRadio, and nearly anywhere else you can get podcasts. Also, we want to hear from you. You can leave comments, get in touch and stream episodes on the podcast website, bossbetternowpodcast.com. Until next time. Thanks for listening and thank you for all that you do to care for so many.

Alyssa:
This show is sponsored by Joe Mull and Associates. Remember commitment comes from better bosses. Visit joemull.com today.

 

 

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