15. Activating Talent + Leveling Up as a Leader

Episode 15: Activating Talent + Leveling Up as a Leader (Summary)

Activating the talent of your employees, the beloved movie that…you just didn’t get, and why it might be time for you to level up and start playing bigger at work. That’s all coming up right now, on Boss Better Now.

Links:
To learn more about Joe Mull, visit his website ​Joemull.com​.
To hear more from Joe Mull visit his YouTube channel​.
To learn how to invite Joe to speak at an event, visit ​Joemull.com/speaking​.
To check date availability or to get a quote for an event, email ​hello@joemull.com​.
To explore options for coaching from Alyssa Mullet, visit ​Joemull.com/coaching​.
For more information on the BossBetter Leadership Academy, visit Joemull.com/academy.
Email the show at bossbetternow@gmail.com.
To leave comments, ask questions, or to message us visit our Boss Better Now Podcast Facebook Page.
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Transcript – Episode 15: Activating Talent + Leveling Up as a Leader

Joe:
Activating the talent of your employees, the beloved movie that you just didn’t get, and why it might be time for you to level up and start playing bigger at work. That’s all coming up right now on Boss Better Now.

Alyssa:
You’re listening to Boss Better Now. Please welcome speaker, author, and Gryffindor, Joe Mull.

Joe:
Hello, BossHeroes. I commend you on once again, finding just a few minutes in our chaotic existence to refill your boss cup with us. Take a deep breath, clear your mind, and let’s get it going. Please welcome my co-host, professional coach, Alyssa Mullet.

Alyssa:
Did I say that right? Cause now I’m questioning myself. Gryffindor that?… I know that’s Harry Potter. Okay. But again, I always question myself whenever it comes to anything, you know, Disney and or whatever. I don’t. Yeah. That… They made that, right?

Joe:
No, no. Oh, we have so much work to do. No, they did not. No, Disney did not make Harry Potter.

Alyssa:
Okay. Well, but they have a world, right? Like (Joe: No.) I know that. Oh, well where the heck is Harry Potter World at?

Joe:
Universal? It’s in the same city, right? Same. So same city, Orlando, but uh, Oh, I have so much to teach you. Goodness.

Alyssa:
I have enjoyed the movies, uh, of Harry Potter. Um, and my kid has a few Lego sets that are, he really likes of the whole Harry Potter’s schematic thing with the train. He has the Hogwarts train and everything, but I, again, I’m just kind of, eh, take it or leave it with that. (Joe: So, you’ve not read the books?) No, goodness. No.

Joe:
Did I ever tell you that I read the books because I wanted to be able to dismiss them?

Alyssa:
Real…(Joe: Yeah) with what, like as … (Joe: As stupid.) As Not magical enough?

Joe:
As that’s like a kids’ book and why are adults clamoring over these? I was, I was working at Ohio University and was just starting grad school. And there were a couple of folks on the staff, on… my colleagues. The fourth Harry Potter book was just coming out and they were just obsessed. And I remember thinking, this is the dumbest thing I’ve ever heard of. This is a kids’ book. Why are these adults dressing up and lining up at bookstores? This is ridiculous. And so I was, I was trying to be worldly and I thought it’s not appropriate to dismiss something like you can’t say, Oh, that’s a terrible movie if you’ve never seen the movie. Right. And so I, I went and I bought the first book and I read it, Oh man, it was phenomenal. (Alyssa: You liked it.) And I’ve been a big Harry fan ever since. And my kids love Harry Potter. And, um, not to go too far down a rabbit hole, but uh, my oldest child, my daughter, her name is Lily. And one of the reasons we liked that name, uh, that is Harry Potter’s mother’s name. And she, uh, is the symbol of love throughout the whole series of books. And so that’s one of the reasons that we named our daughter, Lily.

Alyssa:
Good grief. See, like I, whenever you say things like that, then I’m like, I am missing out. Cause like I would, I watched all the movies. I, I don’t have any semblance of that deep of ness that you would tie to it. You know, his Mo I don’t even remember his mother’s name. And, and now that you’re talking about it, I’m like, Oh my gosh, that’s really beautiful… aw. You know, how meaningful is that?

Joe:
Well, I tell folks all the time, it is a kids’ book, but they grow up with the kids. And so the, the first three stories are pretty, uh, ad adolescent for lack of a better term, but then they get a little darker and more sophisticated as they go up. And, uh, the, the movies are great, but the books are better. So if you’re ever just looking for something to kind of easily dive into on a weekend or a plane trip, grab the first Harry Potter, give it a chance. And maybe you will be surprised.

Alyssa:
I’ll take your word for it.

Joe:
It’s not, not going on the list anytime soon. Huh?

Alyssa:
I’ve got plenty of books in my stack … and in my rotation.

Joe:
Um, well, our, our topic for today, uh, is activating talent and, um, why employees getting to use their talent and gifts at work is so important. Uh, and in particular, the ways in which bosses, uh, can activate talent. And this really is tied to the conversation we had in our last episode, Alyssa, where we talked about the conditions that we need to create in order for people to thrive. And one of them that is critically important that we really didn’t get into in the last episode was aligning people’s talents, strengths, skills, and gifts to the job that they’re in. We know that when people in the workplace get to use their talents and strengths, at least three hours a day, not only is their engagement through the, through the roof, but their overall health and well-being is better, right. When there’s alignment between what I’m good at and what energizes me and, and how I spend my time during the workday, uh, we reap all sorts of gifts out of that. Uh, how can bosses do a better job at activating the unique talents and strengths and gifts of the people in their charge in the workplace?

Alyssa:
Well, that’s a million dollar question, right? But I think that the entirety of just looking at that as something to begin with is where to start. Right. Um, because I feel like in society in general, we are prone to look at our deficits are weaknesses, right? And so the performance evaluation systems that I’ve always encountered in the workplace are counterintuitive to playing to someone’s strengths, you’re focusing on what people need to improve. And, and there’s not really a true recognition or a true opportunity to hone in on someone’s strengths and talents. So I feel like being able to acknowledge that we traditionally have not had systems in which we are acknowledging and playing to people’s strengths, um, is the first step, um, to activating an actual plan to then do so. Right.

Joe:
I am so glad you brought up performance reviews because the very construct of how we do performance management all year long with employees, it’s sort of the opposite of what it should be, right. Let’s spend all of our effort and energy attacking your weaknesses. Let’s, let’s see if we can put forth a tremendous amount of effort to elevate you from not good enough in these areas to average

Alyssa:
Overall, right.

Joe:
Overall. Instead of maybe saying, Hey, look, there are like three or four things that are just perfect for you. And that you’re amazing at, and that are clearly your sweet spot. So rather than spending considerable time and effort making you average to get you to average in a handful of things, maybe I can tweak your role in such a way that 80% of your time is spent doing the handful of things that you’re really good at. And now there are some folks who will hear that and who will interpret that as well then people should never have to do anything at work that they don’t like, or that they’re not good at good at. And of course, that’s not what I’m saying. I’m talking about proportionality in terms of the, of the work. Have you ever had the opportunity to do that for someone as a leader, Alyssa? Or have you ever been in a position where you got to play to your own strengths in the majority of your work time?

Alyssa:
I think, um, after I, um, took my coursework at Duquesne, uh, for coaching, um, that’s when I started to recognize this because there is a, uh, uh, textbook that, um, we go over in that course and I have it still up on my bookshelf up here, it’s called Play to Your Strengths. Right, right. Um, and that kind of changed my perception and my understanding of what the heck am I doing? Like for myself and for my team, you know, I, it is the continual focus of that negative. The, you know, what you’re not doing, what, what you could be better at that we continually nitpick in one way or another. And so, yes, I did have the opportunity, um, to start incorporating, um, after that knowledge, some actual ways in which I felt like I could better serve and it served me and my purpose connected me to a deeper purpose, uh, for my work there. And I hope, I, I think that that’s my ultimate wish as a leader is that people saw me trying to do that for them, trying to help them grow and be the very best version of themselves authentically, um, in every capacity, not, you know, not just like, Oh, this bit of your, your life you’re, you’re doing fine at, but then you got to like work on this. I really hope that people thought I genuinely cared about their purpose and their reason for showing up to work.

Joe:
Cause it’s tied to what they’re good at. Right. Cause they’ll feel fulfilled when they get to act on right. The things that are naturally the right fit for them in and amongst some of what you just said. I heard what are probably three things that leaders need to do. And, and we’re getting ready to launch our BossBetter Leadership Academy here at Joe Mull and Associates. (Alyssa: So exciting!) And we’re going to be… It is it’s exciting. And we’re going to be putting out a whole rich deck of content for folks all year long, who are subscribers to the program. And one of the things that we’re going to be talking about early on is the importance of aligning talent to role. And, uh, there are three things I think that leaders need to be constantly doing for the people that they supervise. Inquire, notice, and deploy. Those are going to be my three pieces of advice to our listeners. So the first is, is inquire. We need to be constantly talking to our employees and asking, inquiring, what do you like about your work? What really energizes you? What’s the stuff you really enjoy doing? What do you feel like you’re really good at? Like every job I ever had, uh, I ended up being good at making things pretty on the computer. Whether it was designing a brochure or making a sign, I just had a knack for it. And I, I, it was never a part of my job description, but I ended up doing it everywhere. And I liked doing that sort of thing. And it was because of the, of the second step, which was people noticed, you know, as supervisors, we need to have dialogue, we need to about strengths and what energizes us and what people are good at, but we need to notice it too.

Joe:
And so we need to be, as much as possible, in the trenches with people and keeping an eye on where they seem to really shine. And when we notice it, we need to be explicit that we’ve noticed it. We need to say that we’ve noticed it. Hey, I noticed that you were really good at X. And there’s a very good likelihood that every single, most of the people who are listening to this podcast who are leaders in one way or another probably landed in the position because somebody noticed that they would potentially be good at it. Somebody maybe pulled them aside and said, Hey, have you ever thought about applying for a management position? And so somebody noticed an affinity or a talent or some, some gifts. And then the third thing is deploy. Once you notice a talent or once you have a dialogue about it, how can you deploy that person to use that talent more often at work?

Joe:
So if you have somebody who’s really great at diffusing, angry customers on the phone, asking them to do a little primer, walkthrough, uh, of how to do that well with other people on the team is a way to activate their talent. Have them lead a meeting on the subject, um, asking people, okay, you said you really like making things pretty on the computer, Joe, and yeah, you definitely have a knack for that. Um, we’ve got some projects coming up. Would you like to be on one of the committees? You know, that’s a way to activate talent. So having that dialogue, asking those questions, noticing those things and deploying people to use that talent is the sort of the tactical way to do it from the perspective of being a great boss.

Alyssa:
I love everything you just said because it’s so thoroughly aligns with some of the internal coaching processes that I try to develop in clients. Which so when you inquire, you’re getting curious, you’re asking questions, right. And so, to try, and we’re trying to create that self-curiosity. Oh, what’s that about? You know, Oh, you know, wonder why I feel that way or whatever it might be, right. The noticing is absolutely noticing. And then the key thing for me is, um, that plays into this whole, to your strengths is the ability to notice without negative judgment of others and of yourself and the internal coaching process. So then then deploying is, you know, the action, how, how all this internal process, how it flows out of you, right? So this, those are really astute, uh, tactical strategies that leaders can use to help their teams in a real tangible way.

Joe:
And I think we have to remember, there’s kind of a, this sounds really ominous and it’s not meant to, but there’s a dark side to not getting to use your talent at work, right? If you are doing work that, um, requires no thought no effort, no time that doesn’t fit with your gifts, we get bored. We get complacent. You know, I remember for years, uh, you and I worked together at a large healthcare system, a large academic healthcare system. Uh, we won’t name them. Let’s just call them “the mothership”. We worked for years at “the mothership”, um, which I still have a lot, a lot, a lot of friends there. Uh, and they, they do a lot of incredible work. And by working at a very large and, and prominent in the community health center, I don’t know if you had this experience a lot, but I did.

Joe:
People would say to me all the time, Hey, I’m going to apply at “the mothership” and I’m applying for this front desk position. And now I would have this conversation with people who had master’s degrees and 10 years of experience, and this position was paying $12 an hour. And they were so clearly overqualified. And I would say, well, why are you applying for that position? And they would say, I just want to get my foot in the door. I mean, yes, the number of times I heard that phrase and I would have to have an uncomfortable conversation, which is I’m not going to go to my employer and recommend you for a job that you’ve already said, you’re going to leave as fast as possible – and that you are overqualified for, because you’re going to be bored and bored people do a couple of damaging things, right?

Joe:
They look for problems that don’t exist. They don’t, they don’t bond themselves to the team, especially if you’ve got, you’ve got one foot in the door there, but you’ve got one foot out the door to the next opportunity that you’re scanning the job openings for. Right. So when, when we have people in the right roles, when people are in the right fit, both in terms of where they want to be professionally in their career and with their talent that we be, we become so engaged with the work that we don’t have time to get caught up in all that other BS that that could potentially distract us. Did you, did you ever have that experience the whole foot in the door conversation?

Alyssa:
Oh, I, well, you know, I started my career at that said place as a recruiter. And one of the ways in which we, you know, scanned through applications and resumes, one of the, you know, rejection codes is overqualified. Absolutely. Like, you know, apply for what plays to your strengths and know that that’s the kind of position and organization that you want to say yes to because they are looking to your strengths to make them stronger. Yes. Ultimately, yes.

Joe:
And let’s make sure we don’t bury the headline here though for, for our BossHeroes that are listening. Um, this is not a conversation about rejecting people who don’t come to you with strengths. This is about looking at the people who are there right now and saying, what are your gifts? What are your strengths? And how do I position you to use those more often in your day-to-day work? Um, you mentioned, uh, play to your strengths, the book, uh, there’s another great resource out there. A lot of folks are probably familiar with it. It’s the StrengthsFinders book. It’s, Clifton’s StrengthsFinders, we’ll, we’ll link to both of these books on the podcast webpage in the episode transcript, if you want to go looking for them. Um, but in StrengthsFinders, they move people through a process to evaluate what some of their innate strengths are. And there’s a great story that I, I think it’s from that book, I may be crediting this incorrectly, but I think I encountered it in, in Clifton StrengthsFinders.

Joe:
Uh, and it’s a story that’s attributed to Mark Twain about a man who dies and goes to heaven. And he meets St. Peter at the pearly gates. And he starts asking St. Peter all the things that he wanted answers to when he was alive on earth. And at one point he says to St. Peter, I was a, a big student of military history. Tell me St. Peter, who was the greatest general who ever lived. And St. Peter says, Oh, that’s easy. He’s standing right over there. And our guy looks, and then he says, well, hold on St. Peter, that can’t be right… for I knew that man, when I was alive on earth and he was, but a common day laborer and St. Peter responds by saying, yes, that’s right. And he would have been the greatest general who ever lived. If he had been a general. We have folks who have strengths that we’re not using. We have folks who are in the wrong roles. We have folks who have the potential to be great, but nobody has asked or, or noticed yet. And I think that’s a huge piece of what we have to do as bosses.

Alyssa:
Wow. That’s a beautiful story. I’ve… I haven’t heard that. It also reminds me that of all the times in which we have the opportunity to ensure that we are playing to people’s strengths is after everyone’s workplace physically, most probably, but definitely in terms of the dynamic of your workplace has shifted change. Morphed, modified a thousand times over in the last year, year and a half. Now’s the time to come back because their folks have changed. And so we need to meet them where they’re at, maybe their strengths have morphed/changed. Maybe what they’re passionate about, needs to be realigned and can be better serving the organization better, serving them. Yeah. Now’s the time.

Joe:
Well said, and that’s a perfect bow on that conversation. So listeners, how are you activating talent? What conversations are you having? What actions are you taking or what questions or activities are you using to notice talent and connect it with the work we’d love for you to tell us about that? You can email the show at bossbetternow@gmail.com. You can leave a comment on the podcast Facebook page, or if you’re streaming this episode online, well then just pop a comment in the box below. We read those all the time.

Joe:
And that brings us to what is everyone’s favorite segment… The Camaraderie Question of the Week. And I don’t say everyone lightly. I just mean that most of the time, when we get an email or a comment on social media, people go out of their way to say, I love the Camaraderie Question of the Week. And we hear that you’re using these in your huddles and with your teams. And we’re thrilled by that because we know that bosses build camaraderie on teams, by making it easier for people to find things in common with each other. So use these questions at meetings and at huddles to facilitate connection and to build camaraderie. And so our question this week, Alyssa, is this… Name a movie that everyone else seemed to love, but that you just didn’t. What do you got for me?

Alyssa:
A big fat old nothing. Um, and not because I’m going to say, Oh, I’m an introvert. You know, I’m, I’m doing a pass thing on that. It’s not that it’s, it’s legit. I, I’m not really much of a movie person. I know you are. And again, this, you know, takes me down about 30 rungs. I have no rungs left on your ladder of, of how I actually function.

Joe:
You have plenty of rungs, my friend.

Alyssa:
In this world. But, um, honestly like movies in general, feel like so much of the distant past that I can’t really, I, I, I have no recollection of even the last movie I saw in the theater. I have some, I mean, we’ve obviously streamed some things, you know, I’ve watched trolls a couple of times, Sonic the hedgehog a couple of times, but I would not say that like, uh, all of the hype, you know, because that’s like a, you know, my movies for my seven year old. So the only thing that stands out in my brain as one time, I went to the theater and we saw this was when I was just my husband and I, The Last Airbender. Okay. And I remember walking out of there cause I remember also it was like an extraordinarily long movie walking of there going, like, they should have paid me to say that, but I don’t remember that there was actually any hype around that either. So I could have just been like, you shouldn’t have seen that movie that was really stupid for you to see that movie period.

Joe:
Well, I think it’s totally okay if you’re not a big movie person and that nothing pops into mind for you with this question. I think for our, our leaders listening, you know, you have carte blanche to change this. You can say name a TV show that everyone loves, but you didn’t get. Or name, uh, an uh, a musician or an artist or a band or a, you know, something like that. Um, you can play with this a little bit, depending on what you know about your team. Um, but what we got out of you,

Alyssa:
Game of Thrones on the whole TV program thing. Like everybody was like all up about that and I’m like, Hmm,

Joe:
Okay. How much, how much of it did you watch?

Alyssa:
I got through maybe like the first two episodes.

Joe:
Okay.

Alyssa:
That’s all I gave it.

Joe:
That’s okay. Hey, that’s alright. And, and having watched it and enjoyed it, uh, it, it, it is a commitment and there’s a lot going on. Yeah. So, uh, you know, it’s not everyone’s cup of tea and I, I get that. So my answer to this question, um, I, I tried to think about what is a movie that I always hear getting a lot of love and that every time I hear it getting love, I kind of go, yeah, I didn’t get it. And the movie that popped into my head is Love Actually. Are you familiar with the movie? (Alyssa: I am, yes.) Okay. Have you seen it? (Alyssa: I have seen that.) So it, it, it shows a lot of Christmastime. It is considered a Christmas movie. We don’t have to have the Die Hard-esque debate. It is a, it is a Christmas movie. Christmas time movie for those who are listening, who haven’t seen it, there’s all of these different stories about love and relationships that seem disconnected.

Joe:
And they all kind of intersect at the end. Um, and the movie is probably most famously known for the scene at the end, where the guy shows up at the girl’s door and with the signs and he’s, and it’s all about like, Hey, don’t say anything, but I’ve loved you forever. And this whole sort of thing. And no, first of all, that’s your best friend’s wife. This was a bad choice. You know, you’re, you’re, you’re in movie world, that’s romance, but in the real world that is drama. And that is don’t get me started. But when I watched, I’ve watched the movie, I, I did, I sat down, it was like the Harry Potter thing. I couldn’t dismiss it without watching it. So I sat down to watch it. And, uh, there was just too much pain and tragedy before the couple of good feelings. And so every time I, it comes on at the holidays and I see people posting online, Oh, that’s my favorite movie. And I’m like, Nope, I don’t get it. I have one or two people who I’m very good friends with that are going to, um, maybe not want to be friends with me anymore after saying that. But for me, the answer is Love Actually.

Alyssa:
So is it it’s based upon the output of feel good emotion does not equal the input that you have of all the negative emotion of the bad things that happen in it.

Joe:
I mean, maybe that’s generally true for me. It’s not always, I have no problem. I, I like things that make me feel things. That’s really clear and profound, isn’t it? But to feel I do, I have a great appreciation for…if I sit down and I watch a movie and it w and I, it sparks an emotion, whatever that emotion is, I have an appreciation for it that, that somebody created a piece of art that could create that kind of response. And somebody just sitting on their couch and watching it, whether it’s sadness, whether it’s empathy, whether it’s thrills or horror, you know, anything that can kind of activate your insides. I have an appreciation for that. Maybe in this movie, it’s because you have to wade through so much pain and tragedy for many of the characters, just to get this tiny little payoff at the end, that feels contrived and that’s so, so I don’t mind the pain and tragedy. I don’t always want to go there and I, but I don’t mind it if the payoff is worth it. And maybe that’s it for me is that I didn’t think it was.

Alyssa:
Hmm. You know, it’s so interesting. I w I won’t keep harping on this, but the, my husband and I just had this conversation recently about music, about how his connection and the emotion that he can connect with through music. And, um, I’ve had that, that kind of conversation of late with some other people about how, how they connect to emotion, right. And for me, that’s, I think that’s why I don’t engage. I don’t engage. I don’t allow myself, um, to get emotional through music, through movies, things of that nature. I use those things as a distraction from all the feeling that is going on all the freaking time in me.

Joe:
I get that. I do. Yep. And very much over the course of the pandemic, I found myself only reaching for certain kinds of movies, like action movies or fantasy, you know, the superhero Marvel stuff, the escapist popcorn stuff, because I’m a kind of a news junkie and a politics junkie. And I watch a lot of that. And it’s been so heavy for so long that by the time I got to, you know, my wife and I get two hours, it’s by, by the time we get the kids to sleep, we get maybe two hours to sit on the couch together and watch something. And, and we want to unplug. And so, yeah, re reaching for stuff that is not as emotionally taxing. I think a lot of people can relate to that, especially over the course of the past year.

Alyssa:
Yeah.

Joe:
And that’s the Camaraderie Question of the Week.

Joe:
Hey, BossHeroes, check it out. One of the phone calls I get most is the, we have one person here who really needs help, phone call. The leader on the line, tells me about an abrasive executive, a manager not meeting the needs of his or her team, or two physicians who can’t overcome conflict. Their question is always the same. Do you have any training I could provide for this person? I have to tell them the uncomfortable truth. Theirs is a problem that training won’t fix. The problems these leaders described require a different solution. Coaching. A professional coach helps people explore new ways of thinking and operating while examining the root causes of their own behavior. When someone needs to examine their approach, adjust their style, become more adaptable, clarify goals, or navigate conflict. There’s only one coach I recommend. Our own, Alyssa Mullet. Alyssa is a professional and executive coach who works one-on-one with clients to tackle the issues that live behind closed doors. Experienced, credentialed, and revered by her clients, Alyssa can help you or any leader struggling on your team, design a path to achievement and professional success. I’ve sent Alyssa to clients all over the country, and they rave about her every time. Every single time. So if you have that one leader who is struggling, or that one leader is you, I strongly encourage you to invest in coaching for more information on working with Alyssa, or to get a quote, visit joemull.com/coaching.

Joe:
Alright Alyssa. We’re going to wrap up the podcast today with a question. And I think it’s a question that our BossHeroes can play with, uh, for a little while and should revisit from time to time when they look at their workplaces and their work environments. And that question is this: Are you settling for what you have, or are you working toward what could be? I’ve been thinking a lot lately about how hard it is at times for bosses to level up. Because I think that for many leaders, the nature of the work prevents them from even giving it consideration. Um, I’ve shared this story with folks before that, when I wrote my first book and was interviewing leaders all over the country, I kept hearing the same turn of phrase. I would say, as a boss, what’s your job. And the phrase I heard back the most was I put fires out every day.

Joe:
And I think a lot of leaders really can relate to that idea that I get up in the morning and I go to work. And I’m just trying to get through the day and, and answer people’s questions and keep people focused and on track. Um, and that, that the nature of working in that way, I think really prevents us from leveling up. Another way to think about it is playing bigger. I think that we, we sometimes owe it to leaders to remind them that life gets easier when they start playing bigger. And so the question that I want to throw out to those who are listening today is: Are you settling for the team you have, or are you doing what it takes to build the team you need?… To, to build the team that your organization needs, that your, your clients, your customers need, you can even swap out that word team with the word culture. Are you settling for the culture that you have, or are you doing what it takes to build the culture that you need? And I don’t know how often Alyssa, you would be able to pause and think through those kinds of really big questions of leadership, uh, when you were leading a team. Um, but if, if a leader’s job is to create the conditions for people to thrive, I would also argue the leader’s job then is to be constantly aspiring to not just what we have, but to what is possible.

Alyssa:
Hmm. So when I hear you, you say those words, I actually took it to like the way up here level. I went into the ooshie, squooshy, gray again, Joe, um, because it reminds me of something that I really, um, identified with in Glennon Doyle’s book Untamed, and her inquiry goes like this. What is the truest most beautiful story that you can imagine telling of yourself?

Joe:
I love it.

Alyssa:
And so when we think about ourselves as leaders, as humans, as all of the things, what is the truest most beautiful story that we want to be able to tell? And is that what you’re doing right now? Any component of what comes to your brain, your heart, your soul, are you doing any of that right now? And are you okay with not doing that? What are you sacrificing right. To not do that?

Joe:
What does it cost to you? That’s a beautiful way of framing it. I don’t know if our listeners heard the police siren in the background. It was such a perfect… No, it’s Okay. That’s a perfect, a perfect way of framing it, that it was criminal. The cops are coming.

Alyssa:
Oh, look at you. See stand-up comedy.

Joe:
If we ask our boss heroes to ask themselves the same question, right? What is, if I think about my team or my workplace, what is the most perfect, beautiful. Sorry. I may be butchering the question. As you asked it a moment ago, what is the most beautiful story that I can imagine for my workplace, for my team? And then you can slide right into sort of a traditional, like Lean Six Sigma analysis conversation where you’re like current state, future state. And if you call the future state, the, the beautiful place, and then you identify your current state, then you can do the in-between, which is what are the obstacles? What are the things that are preventing me from getting to the future state, the beautiful state. And now we get to the work that leaders have to embrace, not to just put fires out every day, but to make their environment better, to, to, um, not settle for team members who maybe are just good enough, but you know, that’s one of the questions I ask leaders all the time. Is there one person at your team who is standing in your way of, of getting of your organization getting where it wants to go or, or, and I think folks on the podcast have heard me ask this question more than once. When I have folks who contact me about team drama and conflict and difficulty, I’ll say, is there one person on your team, or maybe two who, if they went away and never came back, most of these problems would be solved. And the answer is always yes.

Joe:
And so I just want to, end today by encouraging our listeners to periodically stop and say, am I playing big enough? Uh, w is what we do here worthy of the effort I am putting into it at the level that I’m putting into it, not to just get through the day, but to aspire to what could be possible, even though it might be really hard to get there as a leader. Where, and how do I need to play bigger? Because we have farther to go and a greater level of potential to meet. Well, folks, let me ask you a small favor. Would you take a moment sometime today to either review our podcast on Apple podcasts or post on LinkedIn or Facebook, encouraging others to check out our show. This is a small way you can contribute to our movement, to fill workplaces with better bosses on behalf of my fantabulous, co-host Alyssa Mullet until next time, BossHeroes. Thank you for listening and thank you for all that you do to care for so many.

Alyssa:
This show is sponsored by Joe Mull and Associates. Remember commitment comes from better bosses. Visit joemull.com today.

 

 

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